editor relationships

Guest Post Tips: 9 Top Online Editors Vent About Writers

Guest Post Tips from Top Online Editors. Makealivingwriting.com

Are your guest post pitches getting ignored?

If so, there may be some concrete things you can do to fix that. And it’s worth taking the time to figure out how to make your guest post ideas better.

Why?

Plenty of writers I know get all their freelance clients from the exposure they get guest posting on popular blogs. You can slog away posting on your own little blog named “blog” that’s living under a tab on your writer website, but few prospects ever see that.

Start guest posting for some high-traffic sites about the topics you’d like to get hired for, and all of a sudden, the calls start coming. These clients are usually impressed as heck that you’ve appeared on that big blog, and dying to hire you, in my experience.

To improve your guest-post pitches and get more posts approved, you’ve got to know how to please editors. So I asked a bunch of editors at popular sites what writers are getting wrong in their pitches.

Listen in as nine editors tell us their pet peeves. Here’s what writers are getting wrong:

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Freelance Writing Lessons From a Rude Editor: 7 Takeaways

Freelance writing lessons from a rude editor. Makealivingwriting.com

For a while, I had a large client that hired many writers. My contact was an editor who managed the freelance staff. He was an abrupt man who spared no feelings.

At the time, I had only worked directly with clients. I could meet their goals, but my writing lacked force. I over-wrote, dismissed structure, and indulged my narcissism with unnecessary wit. I wasn’t bad, but I had that collegiate write-everything-you-can-think-of mentality.

My first experience working with a professional editor was heart-wrenching. It was a trial by fire: get better to get paid. But those lessons stuck with me and made me a better writer.

Want to improve your writing?

Avoid making the same mistakes as I did, and check out the seven hardest lessons this editor taught me:

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What Editors Love: 11 Insider Tips for Freelance Writers

Editors reveal what they love in a pitch. Makealivingwriting.com

Pleasing editors may seem difficult. But you don’t have to be confused about how to handle these tricky relationships any more.

We’ve got tips for freelance writers who want the inside line on how to become an editor’s favorite, “go-to” writer.

Many editors from consumer, trade, airline, and business magazines have shared their best tips for freelance writers in the Freelance Writers Den’s “Ask an Editor” podcasts.

We combed through the transcripts of these calls to find what makes them say “yes” to pitches. Check out these awesome tips from nine different editors to improve your pitches — and your relationships with editors:

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Worst Writer Mistakes: 8 Editors Reveal What Makes Them Say ‘No’

Top 10 Writer Blunders Editors Tell All. Makealivingwriting.com

Have you ever wished you could find out what editors really think when they read your pitches and stories?

Now you don’t have to wonder, because eight editors have shared their biggest freelancing pet peeves in the Freelance Writers Den’s semi-regular “Ask An Editor” Den meeting calls.

I’ve boiled down reams of transcripts to bring you the choicest remarks about writer mistakes from a mix of consumer, trade, and company magazine editors. Check out these freelance writing sins and learn how to avoid doing the things editors hate most:

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3 Free Ways to Find Out What Editors Really Think

Editor thinkingIt’s one of the biggest problems in freelance writing.

You send out a query to an editor, or a letter of introduction to a business.

And then…nothing.

You never hear back. You’re left to wonder what you’re doing wrong.

Or you submit an article, and it gets killed. They give you some vague reason, such as, “Just not a fit for us at this time.”

How can you ever improve?

You’re stuck. But you need to break through and get answers, or you’re not going to get the kind of great-paying gigs you want.

Fortunately, there are several paths out of this dilemma. One is to hire an expensive writing coach and pay thousands for their input.

But there are free ways, too. Here are three:

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How to Follow Up on Article Queries (Without Being a Stalker)

Waiting

For freelancers, waiting is the hardest part.

But editors receive too many unsolicited queries to respond to each one instantly. And some won’t respond at all unless a query catches their interest immediately.

Good ideas also fall by the wayside if they hit editors’ inboxes during deadline, while they’re on vacation, or if they’re out of the office at a conference or because of an unforeseen event, like an epic storm.

Sometimes it pays to follow up on article queries — as long as you do it in a way that doesn’t make you seem like a stalker.

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