LinkedIn

LinkedIn ProFinder for Freelancers: Will It Help You Find Clients?

Can LinkedIn ProFinder Help You Find Freelance Work? Makealivingwriting.com

When you’re trying to book yourself solid, marketing to get more leads should be your priority. Ever heard of LinkedIn ProFinder?

It’s a tool you can use with your LinkedIn profile to get leads, bid on projects, and potentially land long-term clients.

Sounds good, right? After all, LinkedIn has 433 million users. And it’s a social media platform that’s defined itself as a place for business professionals.

LinkedIn ProFinder launched in 2015 as way to help users find talent and land freelance work. Over the last two years, it’s been widely used by business professionals in many industries. And it’s also gone through a series of changes. Now you’re probably wondering…

Does LinkedIn ProFinder work?

Let’s state the obvious, first. LinkedIn ProFinder is one of many marketing strategies you can use to find clients.

Letters of introduction, query letters, in-person networking, social media marketing, and even cold calling, for example, still work.

If you want to move up, earn more, and make a full-time living as a freelancer, you’ll need to spend a chunk of time marketing consistently.

Want to know if LinkedIn ProFinder can help you land more freelance clients? Here’s what you need to know:

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LinkedIn Profile Mastery for Freelancers: 10 Steps to Get You Hired

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Are you getting great freelance writing clients weekly from your LinkedIn profile? If not, this post is for you.

Most LinkedIn profiles do a poor job of attracting quality prospects. Also, LinkedIn recently changed its layout, which has made the whole job of creating an effective profile a bit trickier.

Why should you care about your LinkedIn profile? Well, because LinkedIn is only the Internet’s best search engine that 500 million users, including loads of major corporations, use every day to find freelancers.

If you don’t believe you can get found in the sea of LinkedIn profiles, let me just say I’ve been hired by no less than three Fortune 500 companies via my LinkedIn profile. This. Is. Real.

Inbound leads from LinkedIn are often terrific, and not just for me. I’ve coached scores of writers through this, and once you fix up your profile, the results can be pretty amazing.

Also, you’d love to get inbound leads and not have to do proactive marketing, right?

I found myself giving the same LinkedIn profile tips over and over in coaching sessions lately, so I thought I’d write it all down so more writers can benefit.

There are some basic things to know that will help you find good clients on LinkedIn. Let’s go element-by-element through the LinkedIn profile format, and I’ll give you a tour of how to make each facet of your profile show you off to best advantage:

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4 Free Email Lookup Tools To Find Editors & Marketing Managers

Easy-to-use email lookup tools for writers. Makealivingwriting.com.

Ever waste half a day in a fruitless search for the email address of an editor or marketing manager? Well, I recently found a simple email lookup system that reliably reveals whether you have the right address.

There’s one catch here: If the person you seek doesn’t use any social media, this system won’t help you sleuth out their address.

But since most folks in business are on LinkedIn, Pinterest, Facebook, Google+ — some social media platform or other — this system is highly useful.

I’ve found this combo better than Rapportive, or Email Hunter (now known simply as ‘Hunter‘), or any of the other popular email lookup tools you may have heard about.

There are four free things you need to use my system:

  1. A Gmail address (just get one, if you don’t already have).
  2. Google Chrome as your browser.
  3. FullContact for Gmail, a Gmail extension for Chrome only. (Heads up: You may need to refresh your Gmail after you install.)
  4. An email permutator that suggests all the likely possible email address formats for any given name (I use a free handout from Rob Ousbey at Distilled that you can download from this page). You could live without this if you’re highly creative in guessing emails, but I found this tool a real time-saver that helps you easily track which versions of your target name you’ve already tried.

You may know that I’m not very tech-savvy, so I want to reassure you these are easy installs to do. I was able to get this hooked up on my own, and didn’t even cry once.

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Freelance Writing Forecast: Ride These Epic Trends in 2017

Freelance writing forecast: Ride these epic trends in 2017. Makealivingwriting.com

Last year, I got out my crystal ball and created a freelance writing forecast that identified 12 hot writing niches for the past year. (You can check and see how I did.)

That post was one of the most useful posts of the year, judging from the traffic it got, so I’ve decided to do a new forecast for 2017.

But this time, rather than good-paying types of writing, I’m calling out the hot trends you should know about to earn well in the coming year.

How you take advantage of these trends and freelance writing forecast will depend on the kinds of writing you like to do and types of clients you serve. These are top-level trends that will affect all of us, whether you’re into blogging, magazine writing, or copywriting.

I’ve included action items that explain how to take advantage of each of these trends in the coming year.

The freelance writing forecast looks bright

The short version: I’ve never been more excited about the opportunities for freelance writers than I am right now.

Ready? Let’s look at the seven biggest trends coming down the pike:

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Is LinkedIn Premium Worth It? Why It’s One Freelance Writer’s Success Strategy

Is LinkedIn Premium worth it? Why it's one freelance writer's success strategy. Makealivingwriting.com

Need to find prospects that can turn into well-paying clients? Don’t we all. But too often, writers hit all the wrong places hoping to land a gig. You’re not likely to find good clients on job boards, content mills, Craigslist, and bidding sites. But that doesn’t mean they’re not out there.

In fact, if you use the right strategy, you can tap into a massive list of potential prospects in your niche using LinkedIn Premium. (Is LinkedIn Premium worth it? I’ll explain.) But I didn’t know that when I got serious about freelancing. I used to troll job boards and send LOIs to people I wasn’t always sure were the decision makers. I had some success with this approach. But I struggled to find the right clients. Sound familiar?

I needed a better way to zero-in on my niche (FinTech), find the right people to pitch and land better-paying clients. But how? I stumbled across the answer when I signed up for Lynda.com. And by chance, I scored a one-year subscription to LinkedIn Premium along with it (LinkedIn Premium now costs $29.99 to $79.99 a month).

I had heard plenty of buzz about LinkedIn Premium. But I was on the fence. I had the same question as a lot of freelancers, is LinkedIn Premium worth it? With a free subscription, I decided to jump in and see what I could do with it to grow my freelancing business. It didn’t take long to get results. I found a $1/word client and developed a strategy to use LinkedIn to move up and earn more. Here’s how I did it:

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Asking for Referrals for Fraidy-Cat Freelance Writers

Scared to ask for referrals? One Writer’s Essential Tips. Makealivingwriting.com

For some freelance writers, it seems like asking for referrals and selling comes easy. They have a huge network of people they’ve cultivated relationships with. Their network hooks them up with new clients. And it’s easy for the same freelance writers to talk about their business in any situation, and get referrals.

That’s what successful freelance writers do. And I wasn’t sure I was cut out to be one of them if asking for referrals was part of the gig.

If you’re afraid to ask for referrals, you’ve probably heard that fraidy-cat freelance writer voice inside your head. You know, the one trying to convince you that:

  • People will think you’re desperate
  • You’re running some kind of scam
  • You can’t possibly provide a service valuable enough to help in any meaningful way

That cat needs to go. It took me a long time to figure this out. But when I finally did, I got a response in 10 minutes, a potential project, and scored another referral for more work. Here’s how I did it:

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