agency

5 Signs That Agency is a Pimped-Out Content Mill

Is That Agency a Pimped-Out Content Mill? Makealivingwriting.com

Want to write for a marketing agency? It’s a great way to scoop up freelance assignments. But if you’re not careful, that agency might actually be a content mill looking for cheap tricks.

Believe me. I learned this the hard way.

When I saw my first article published on US News and World Report I should’ve jumped up and down while singing the Halleluiah chorus.

But I didn’t.

Instead, the sight of it tangled an angry, disgusted knot in the pit of my stomach. I just got pimped by a content mill.

I wrote that article for a digital marketing agency and sold it for 20 bucks. My name wasn’t even on it.

But hers was—the web savvy millennial who’d purchased the content. It was right there next to her photo and the bio touting that she was a freelance real estate writer.

And I don’t want you to make the same mistake.

Here’s how to tell if that agency is nothing more than a pimped-out content mill:

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5 Idiot Blunders I Made on My First White Paper Writing Assignment

5 Idiot Blunders I Made on My First White Paper Writing Assignment

One of the biggest moves a freelance writer can make to earn more is to move into better-paying types of writing.

When you go from, say, writing $20 blog posts to writing white papers that can pay $1,500-$10,000, it’s a big leap.

Of course, a lot can also go wrong when you step into a new, more sophisticated kind of writing that you haven’t done before. But if you want to earn more, at some point you have to buck up your courage and go for it.

A few years back, I fell into an opportunity to write my first white paper, when a writer I knew referred me for the project. I’d heard this was a great-paying writing niche, and I was dying to sink my teeth into one of these big, detailed projects.

Even though I hadn’t written white papers before, I was tapped because the topic was a big company’s nonprofit efforts — which I’d covered in the past, as a reporter. So I knew the end client and what we’d be documenting fairly well.

Maybe that made me a little overconfident. I made a boatload of rookie mistakes that made this first $2,500 white paper gig a lot more unpleasant and lengthy than it should have been.

And I never ended up working for this client again. So. Relationship blown.

Where did it all go wrong? Let me count the ways…

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