finding clients

Writing Career Reboot: 5 Steps to Pick Yourself Up After Trauma

Reboot Your Writing Career After Trauma. Makealivingwriting.com

Is your life and writing career moving along in a linear fashion, continuously getting better?

Be honest. It’ doesn’t work that way for anyone.

The reality is bumpy.

Sometimes you have to abruptly take off work for personal reasons:

  • A major illness or death in the family
  • An accident
  • A baby born prematurely
  • Or any number of unexpected and traumatic reasons

I didn’t pick those examples randomly. They’ve all happened to me or my writing friends.

If you step away from your writing career to deal with major life events, hopefully you’ll reach a point where it makes sense to resume work.

But how do you get back on track?

If you’re restarting after taking a break because of trauma, illness the death of a loved one, or some other traumatic life event, here are five tips to reboot your writing career:

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Monster List of Markets: 135 Places to Find Freelance Writing Jobs

Monster List of Freelance Writing Jobs. Makealivingwriting.com

Are you looking for freelance writing jobs?

Here’s a hint. Content mills, bid sites, and job boards might seem like an easy place to go to find freelance writing jobs, but they’re usually a waste of time.

Too much competition, flaky clients, low rates. That’s usually what you’ll find there. And it doesn’t have to be that way.

You’re better off looking for freelance writing jobs by pitching magazines and websites that pay writers. It’s called pro-active marketing. And it’s a game changer if you’re serious about full-time freelancing.

Instead of sitting around waiting for the Mysterious Force to drop some assignments in your lap, pitch a story idea to a magazine or website. Study the market. Come up with a story idea. Do a little research and mini-interview. Then write a great pitch letter and send it off. Rinse and repeat.

Need a little help figuring out where to pitch your bright ideas? We’ve done some of the hard work for you. Check out this updated monster list of 135 markets (from posts we published in 2018) in a variety of different niches, and start pitching.

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Freelance Writing Jobs: The Secret Sauce to Working for Solopreneurs

The Secret Sauce to Freelance Writing Jobs. Makealivingwriting.com

Are solopreneurs good clients for freelance writing jobs?

If you’re shaking your head (no), I get it. There’s no shortage of one-person business owners out there who are barely scraping by.

Is the person selling widgets to their family and friends a good source for freelance writing jobs, referrals, or a potential client that will pay professional rates. Probably not.

Then there’s the solopreneur who says they’re starting their business on a shoestring…in their parent’s basement…with no money. Not a good prospect for freelance writing jobs either.

But that doesn’t mean you should cross solopreneurs off your potential client list.

Solopreneurs can be great clients. I earned about $15,000 last year writing for solopreneurs, which represents about one-fifth of my total income.

In fact, the right soloprenuer client can be a dream to work with, compared to a larger company with a staff of employees, bigger budget for freelance work, and bureaucracy that slows everything down.

So what’s the secret sauce to finding solopreneur clients that will pay you pro rates for freelance writing jobs? Here’s what you need to know:

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Best Editor Tips: How to Get in Magazines Over and Over

Best Editor Tips to Get More Assignments. Makealivingwriting.com

Here’s a little secret: The best editor in your niche frequently gives the same freelance writers story assignments.

Sounds pretty good if you’re one of those writers, right?

But what if you’re not? Is there a best editor Book of Commandments you can follow to move up and earn more?

That’s kind of the million-dollar question.

You spend a lot of energy and time sending out pitch letters and letters of introduction. How do you catch the attention of the best editors to expand your freelance writing business?

If you’re feeling like trying stay fully booked is an exhausting effort, you’re not alone.

But it doesn’t have to be this way. There’s a more energy-efficient way to get repeat freelance work from the best editors.

Want to learn how to get more assignments with less effort? Here’s how it’s done:

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5 Prospecting Steps to Scoop Up Well-Paid Freelance Work

Prospecting for Well-Paid Freelance Work. Makealivingwriting.com

Are you struggling to find well-paying freelance work and good clients?

Maybe you’re panning for a nugget of gold on a bidding site for writers. Or you’re chipping away in the content mills hoping to find better-paying freelance work. Maybe you’ll strike it rich.

Prospecting this way usually ends up being a huge waste of time. You’ll get a bite. And then discover you’re negotiating with bottom-feeders who want to pay 90 percent less than your asking rates for freelance work.

If that sounds anything like your prospecting experience as a freelance writer, I’ve been there. But it doesn’t have to be that way. You can change the way you look for clients.

Identifying and vetting prospects is one of the most important things you need to do as a freelance writer. You need quality clients who respect your skills and pay well. Right?

Want to learn how to find better-quality prospects in less time? When I started using this prospecting strategy, I booked $4,000 in revenue in just six weeks. Pick up your tools and follow me.

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Pitch Story Ideas to These 99 Markets for Freelance Writing Jobs

Pitch These Markets for Freelance Writing Jobs. Makealivingwriting.com

If you want to land more freelance writing jobs, you want to try and throw strikes every time you pitch a market, a magazine, or a niche blog.

Think of it like you’re trying to win the World Series of freelance writing.

It’s a numbers game. The more you practice, the more consistent you’ll be at landing assignments. And the more money you’ll score for the home team.

What should you do before you pitch a story idea? Start with a warm-up.

Study the market. Read back issues. Check the site or publications for the writer’s guidelines playbook. Do a little research or even a pre-interview with a source.

Then wind up and throw a pitch in the strike zone with a great idea for a story or blog post.

Looking for freelance writing jobs? Pitch these 99 markets to move up and earn more:

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