time management

Productivity for Freelancers: Could Binge-Watching Help?

Can Binge-Watching Increase Productivity for Freelancers?. Makealivingwriting.com

The best part of freelance writing—and the worst part—is being your own boss. There’s nobody else standing over you, forcing you to calculate every minute to measure productivity.

It’s up to you to stay motivated and disciplined, even on days when you’d rather scoop the litter box than finish that blog post, write a query, or find new clients to pitch.

How do you keep the words flowing in spite of online and off-line distractions, family responsibilities, and bad days?

Most people aren’t born with a sixth-sense for productivity. In fact, a lot of people, including writers, are notorious for stalling, wasting time, and procrastinating for an infinite list of reasons (ahem, excuses).

That ends now. You can learn productivity habits to help you maximize your time, get work done, and even carve out a little time for binge-watching your favorite show. Here’s how:

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Freelance Juggling Tips from Work at Home Moms

Juggling Tips for Work at Home Moms. Makealivingwriting.com

Ever wonder how work at home moms balance freelance assignments, family life, a day job, and everything else?

If you’ve ever thought, “What’s the point? It’s just too hard,” you’re not alone. Trying to juggle diaper duty, day-job deadlines, grocery shopping, and freelance work can be a challenge.

But work at home moms tend to have a few things in common when it comes to carving out time to get freelance work done.

They’re scrappy. They know how to multi-task. They know how to network with other moms. And when push comes to shove, work at home moms can turn a 15-minute block of time into a productive work session.

Know any work at home moms like this you can model?

In a recent Freelance Writers Den podcast, we talked with two work at home moms who have built thriving writing careers in the middle of busy lives. Here’s how it’s done:

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Build Success with the Lego Productivity Method for Writers

Build Success: The Lego Productivity Method for Writers. Makealivingwriting.com

How do you build success as a freelance writer and make the most of your time?

When you’ve got writing deadlines closing in, freelance marketing work to do, and a long list of emails to read through, and they all seem important, it’s hard to get stuff done.

Have you ever sat in front of your computer for a day, buzzed from one thing to the next, and felt like you didn’t get anything done?

That’s not exactly how you build success as a freelance writer. You have to figure out how to fit all the pieces together, brick by brick, to make it all work.

But freelancing doesn’t exactly come with a perfectly-scripted instruction manual like a Lego set does. Every writer builds success a little bit differently.

So how do you figure out how to meet your writing deadlines, find great clients, get more work done, enjoy the freedom of being of being a freelancer, and ultimately make more money?

Ed Gandia’s solution is the Lego productivity method for writers. Check out the step-by-step instructions to build success in this Q&A:

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Kids Driving You Crazy? One Writer’s Family-Friendly Productivity Plan

The productivity plan for freelancers with kids. Makealivingwriting.com

Are your kids driving you crazy? If you don’t have a productivity plan as a stay-at-home freelancer, getting work done can be hard.

It’s something I know a lot about.

I’m a stay-at-home mom. I have eight kids. I home-school. And I have a thriving freelance writing business.

It’s kind of crazy. And I struggled to figure out how to make it work.

When you’re trying to land client work or complete an assignment, with kids begging for your attention, you might think the last thing you want to spend time on is a productivity plan.

But you actually need that in place first.

Why? Let’s just say kids make the work at home experience more interesting.

I get more work done now in less time than I used to. And then there’s the added benefit of maintaining my sanity with such a busy household.

Want to know how I do it? Here’s my productivity plan for freelance writers with kids:

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Now Boarding: The Year-End ‘Ugly Barge’ of Productivity for Writers

Board the 'Ugly Barge' of Productivity for Writers. Makealivingwriting.com

Productivity for writers has a way of going down the drain during the holidays.

It’s all too easy to get sucked into the vortex of dinner parties, gift shopping, time off, and binge-watching a new season of your favorite TV show.

Your usual schedule for freelance writing and marketing gets squeezed by other things.

Sound familiar?

Fortunately, there’s plenty of time to get stuff done, complete assignments, land new clients, and still enjoy the holidays.

But to get from here to there, you’ll want to get on board the Ugly Barge of Productivity for Writers, says business consultant and former U.S. Army officer Charlie Gilkey.

In a recent Freelance Writers Den podcast, we talked with Gilkey and freelance writer Frances Booth about:

  • Productivity
  • Systems
  • Procrastination
  • Writer’s block
  • Goal-setting
  • And other topics

The goal: Help you make the most of the 71 days, 1,704 hours, and 102,240 minutes left in 2017.

Want to know the secret to year-end success as a freelance writer? Get on board.

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4 Reasons Freelance Writers Shouldn’t Be Grammar Police

Why Grammar Police Make Terrible Writers. Makealivingwriting.com

Note: Are you part of the grammar police? Or do you despise well-meaning writers who can’t overlook an errant punctuation mark or typo? In this post, originally written by Linda Formichelli, she serves up four in-your-face reasons grammar police make terrible freelance writers. Enjoy! —Carol.

The other day I received this email in response to a marketing message I sent out to my subscription list:

Basic grammar forbids the use of double negatives, “…using the wrong
set of skills for the wrong job”. An authority on writing must master
the rules of writing before they can be taken seriously.

(I so wanted to let this guy know that “the wrong skills for the wrong job” is hardly a double negative, and that some of the greatest writers of all times used double negatives for emphasis — Shakespeare, anyone? But I took my own advice and hit Delete.)

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