10 Ways Writers Can Use LinkedIn to Find Freelance Gigs

Of all the types of social media out there you can use to promote your freelance writing, I think LinkedIn is one of the most useful. In working with writers in my mentoring program, I’ve discovered a lot of writers aren’t making full use of this platform.

Folks seemed to appreciate my recent Twitter tips, so I thought I’d do a sequel on how to get the most mileage out of LinkedIn.

First off, here’s why I like LinkedIn and recommend you become active on it: Unlike Twitter, Facebook, Reddit, and many other platforms, LinkedIn is all business. There’s nobody on there with a photo of themselves half-nekkid with a drink in their hand, where their bio says they just wanna par-tay, or that they watch Glee.

Folks are on LinkedIn to further their careers. Period. So that to me screens out a lot of the bullcrap that often turns social media into such a time suck. Nobody’s playing Farmville on here or asking you to watch some dumb video. The audience may be smaller than Facebook’s at about 100 million, but it’s a higher-quality group.

LinkedIn also offers quite a few interesting features that are particularly useful to freelancers.

How can LinkedIn help you as a freelance writer? Let me count the ways:

  1. Key words in your profile. Start by fully filling out your profile and stuffing it with key words about what you do — mine currently says “freelance writer, award-winning blogger, copywriter, and writing mentor.” Why? Because companies and publications that need a freelance writer search by key words for the type of writer they’re looking for. My profile also names my nearest major city, useful for people searching for a local writer — that’s how an airline magazine based in my town came to call me recently to write a $500 business-finance article. They’re not the only major company I’ve had call me cold off my LI profile, either. So fill out your profile, people. Your profile converts people into buyers the best of any page on LI. People like to hang out in the groups (more on them later), but filling out your profile completely may be your most efficient use of time on LI.
  2. “Who’s viewed my profile?” A lot of people don’t realize you can click on this little sidebar widget and get more information about who has been looking at your LI profile. Yes, if you’re only on the free level, sometimes it won’t show you much — some of the information will be hidden. But sometimes, it will reveal contact names. If they smell like a prospect, I then send them a message: “Hi, were you looking for a freelance writer? I noticed you were looking at my profile. Let me know if there’s anything I can do to help!” If I have a particular expertise relevant to their industry, I mention that as well. I get a lot of responses to this, as people are amazed you knew they were checking you out.
  3. The blog tool. This one’s pretty obvious — use LI’s BlogLink tool to pull your blog onto your LI profile page. That will make it also appear in the blogrolls of all your connections that use the blog tool, too. Presto: Instant promotion! Great way to spread your blog around.
  4. The editor connections. I find LI is the place to look up all your former editors. Search for them and ask to connect. Shmooze, catch up, find out what they’re doing now. Do they need a job? Send them leads. Do they have a job? Maybe they can use you again, or know another editor using freelancers and could refer you. At one point when I was really needed a few new clients, I decided to reconnect with every editor I’d ever liked. It was fun! And one I hadn’t written for in a decade ended up referring me a great new global client that I did $1,000 of work for last year, and they’re still calling me.
  5. The jobs. If you’re going to look at online job ads, LI is one of my favorite places to do it, as an increasing number of their ads are exclusive to LI. Their ads cost money, and the companies tend to be high-quality. I use one of my favorite ad-hunting tricks and look at LI’s full-time job ads. In my experience as a staffer, the appearance of a staff-writer job ad means a crisis situation — someone usually left months back. My strategy? Apply to any publication or company of interest, and just let them know you’re a happy freelancer, not looking for a full-time job, but I’m so right for you, look at my experience…do you perhaps also work with freelancers? I got one $1,500 assignment last year this way from an interesting national trade magazine.
  6. InMail for prospecting. I have yet to try this, but it appears that sending a paid-level InMail on LI has a response rate of 30 percent and up. In fact, InMail does so well that LI now guarantees you’ll get a response — or they give you another InMail message to send free. Sort of a no-lose proposition. Apparently there’s a real novelty factor at this point in time to sending these, so people often will get back to you. Target your dream prospective clients, write your pitch, and then fire away on LI.
  7. In-person networking. Many LI groups also meet in person — my local Linked:Seattle chapter has networking events with more than 500 attendees. If you’re interested in small-business clients, these can be a gold mine. One of the best ways to make social media work really productive is to deepen those online connections by going offline. If you have a location-based LI group that isn’t meeting live, consider starting a live event and serving as host.
  8. The groups. You don’t necessarily find gigs in groups, but the writer groups on LI are one of the best free places I’ve found to discuss rates, negotiating, and other client issues. The biggest and busiest is LinkedIn Editors & Writers. I’ve made some nice friendships through LI groups, and we can all use the support. There’s also Writeful Share, a group where people post overflow jobs and try to share leads. Active participation in groups where you share your expertise can also lead to some nice new traffic to your blog.
  9. The jobs inside the groups. As Writeful Share’s model shows, job leads do sometimes get passed around inside of LI groups. Besides searching the main, full-time job postings, this is probably the next-best gig-finding opportunity on LI.
  10. Answer questions. I haven’t spent time on this, but I know many people who’ve done well answering and asking questions on LI’s main Answers tab. Yet another place on the platform to share your expertise and attract interest.

Do you have questions about how to earn more from your writing? Learn more in my community Freelance Writers Den – take ecourses, attend live events, ask writing pros your questions in our forums, and use our exclusive Junk-Free Job Board.

Photo: Flickr Creative Commons: smi23le

  1. Shlomo says:

    Carol -
    Thanks for these tips. I’ve been a member on LinkedIn for a while, but never had a good sense of how to really use it. I’ve just been laid off from a job and am starting to look for ways to make money as a freelancer. I think I’ll start working on my profile!

  2. John Soares says:

    Carol, I agree that all serious freelance writers need to be on LinkedIn. I recently had a high-level editor find me through LinkedIn: He e-mailed me and we set up a 30-minute discussion about a major project coming down the pipeline.

    Since then I’ve beefed up all the major areas of my profile, linked to my blogs, and made several dozen quality connections. I also update my status several times per week and I’ve begun to participate in group discussions.

    I just purchased LinkedIn for Dummies, 2e, which I highly recommend.
    John Soares recently posted..House-Sitting and the Location-Independent Freelance Lifestyle

    • Carol Tice says:

      I have had Fortune 500 companies call me off my LinkedIn profile…you can’t believe the high-quality clients who are using LI to find contractors. They know everybody on there is really a serious business person so it makes a good screen for them vs just doing a Google search. Stuff that bio with key words, people!

  3. Erin Hill says:

    I signed up for linked in a long time ago and have yet to fully implement it. Thanks for this! And thanks to John for the book title. I always order a book when I want to learn more about something in particular.

    As for the comment about the upcoming webinar…there is a question I’ve always wanted to ask but kept forgetting about. How do you find work by browsing websites and finding poorly written ones and then recommending your own services? I’ve heard of plenty of people doing this, both for writing assignments and web design. How do you go about it delicately? It seems that egos are easily injured, and no matter how nicely you phrase it, you’re still basically saying “your writing sucks.”

    I know so many writers who have used this tactic that it makes me want to give it a try, but I’m a little nervous and skeptical. These feelings are compounded because I recently used this technique, but to help another writer who had several typos and grammatical errors on his webpage. I softened the blow by also saying something nice about his site, and that led to him giving me unsolicited advice via email for weeks after. Most of his advice his wasn’t very good, and he became insulted when I (respectfully) disagreed. This experience has shown me that no matter how nicely you say things, people still find a way to become offended…

    • Carol Tice says:

      Great question, Erin!

      Guess I’ve tended to sidestep the issue of quality at the outset. I look for what’s missing, and that’s what I encourage the writers in my mentoring program to do.

      As in, “I noticed your blog hasn’t been updated in six months — maybe you could use some help from a freelance writer in keeping it regularly updated with useful content for your prospects?”

      Or, “I notice your competitors all have a) strong “about us” pages with team bios, b) a good press page c) interesting case studies d) a social-media strategy e) a blog, f) sharper product descriptions, g) whatever else your research reveals they are missing — and your site doesn’t have that.”

      So the focus isn’t on the quality of current content, but on missing pieces that would help them have a more compelling site and convert more visitors into at least prospects who’ve left them an email, or leads who call them up.

      Once we’re friends and I’ve developed some kick-ass content for them, of course it’ll quickly become obvious the other content could use a rewrite, and by then we have a trust relationship where you believe me when I tell you that — often, clients will be telling ME that after I start blogging for them, so it avoids the whole awkward “you suck” conversation.

  4. Wendy says:

    I know that I replied to an earlier post today–but you nailed this one. Matter of fact, I don’t go on my FB account because I think it’s juvenile. I do enough work online that I don’t have patience having my “friends” talk about their personal lives, tending their virtual goats, and other inane things that 40-somethings are doing.

    I love LI–I’ve learned a lot and I’ve even commented on groups that I specialize in–such as gardening, ag, farming, etc. LI can benefit writers beyond writing groups. You can also share your expertise in the niches that you write for. Right now, I’m in a heated discussion over raw milk with one of the ag. groups that I belong to on LI. It lets me spread my wings–and I know that one of the editors that I write for could be reading my posts because we belong to the same group. You never know where these discussions will take you! :) Thanks for a great blog!
    Wendy recently posted..Five Tips to Overcoming Your Writing Fears

  5. This post comes at the right time. I recently attended a seminar on getting more our of LinkedIn. I am working on updating my profile and a few other things to make my profile stand out to prospective clients.
    Clara Mathews recently posted..How to Make a Great Restaurant Website

  6. Nisha says:

    Really practical tips – I could find a long term deal simply by posting a thread on a Small Business Group offering ghost blogging service. Although I struggled to manage their gigs for a while, I am more than happy with the company that is selling electronic products.

  7. Teresa says:

    I am on SSD benefits due to my MS. I have had offers to join a group and earn money writing online but I don’t know if I can do that without losing my benefits. I am not always able to write, so I can’t risk losing all of my benefits on a chance of online writing income. Do you know if there’s a way I can have both?
    Teresa recently posted..Not as Perfect

    • Carol Tice says:

      I am not a federal benefits expert, Teresa. I would talk to your administrator about what you’re planning and find out the answer.

      I sense your very justified fear of losing your benefits…I suggest you find out exactly what you can and can’t do. Usually there’s a level to which you can earn without endangering your benefits, or where your benefits will be reduced in kind but not eliminated. You need clarity on exactly where those limits are.

      If you know them, you should be able to write up to that point and you’ll know exactly where you’d need to stop in each year to avoid endangering your benefits.

      It’s going to be a question of being a crack accountant and carefully tracking your earnings so you know where you’d need to stop.

      Best of luck with it!

    • Gladys Alicea says:

      Hi, Teresa,

      If you decide to do freelance work, Social Security allows you to earn no more than $800 per month, total, gross. That’s the amount you can make without disturbing your benefits. Go above that, and your SS income will be affected; it’s a formula that the government uses. Their website, socialsecurity.gov, has most of the information. I’m in the boat with you, Teresa. For the past eight years, I’ve been on SSD; fought it every step of the way for five, and ended up bankrupt. All I worked for, gone. Remorse and chronic pain pushed me off my path. It’s time to regroup and regenerate. Freelance copywriting and editing was my life once, and it can be again, even if I have to do it from bed.

      On a side note, I’ve been on Linkedin for a while, received many invitations to connect, but haven’t done anything. My profile doesn’t have much, but it must be enough to spark interest and, had I followed through, I probably would have secured some good projects.

      Today, I happened to catch what may have been an old episode of Charlie Rose, and Reid Hoffman, one of Linkedin’s founders, was on. He was interesting and intriguing and, I think, a visionary who opened my eyes to the crime of wasting talent. My creative streak’s still there, bigger and better than ever. I’ve been self-educating in diverse subjects; very exciting. Plus, writing for my own amusement, but it’s time to make some dough (in case I try and fail to sell any short stories, poems or the book I’m writing). Tried doing a web page on a creative site, but am not good with code, so I dumped it. I’d rather spend my time writing and knowing no one will steal my creative side.

      No really, I’m modest and truthful, with a copywriting, editing, marketing, public relations, and sales track record in corporate to prove it. Most of my creative writing, particularly the warmth of poetry, comes naturally…and I can write rhymes for anything, but storytelling is something I’m teaching myself through diverse methods. That’s how I learned to write copy for all sorts of venues; for years after I left my national marketing directorship, I made a pretty decent income as a freelancer, until disability. Well, I’m not dead yet, so all is possible, right?

      Since watching the Rose interview with Reid, I feel more inspired to figure out how I can get the most out of this site, and use it to my advantage. I immediately began researching, and here I am. I never embark on any project without research. It’s key, and there’s much more to learn.

      I’m sure this comment is too much information, Teresa. It’s just nice to know I’m not alone, and wanted you to know the same. Besides, it may prove a good motivator for us.

  8. I’ve been finding LinkedIn booming lately with job talk and leads. Thanks for specifics.
    Michelle @PowerfulHER recently posted..PowerfulHER- POWERFUL RT @geoffdua- @ChangeInLibya Ill make u a deal Share burdens I pray 4 Libya &amp u 4 tornado damage in my home http-tco-drMETxk

  9. Great ideas Carol. Linkedin was my first venture into making an online presence. Now that I know more I should go back and update. It really makes sense to concentrate marketing where the jobs are. I enjoy Facebook and read your updates via FB, but I’m doubtful it will lead to many gigs for myself. With limited hours in the day it is important to emphasize where you will see the payoff.

  10. Misty says:

    @Carol Another black-belt post as always, and I can’t wait to hear about what you learned at SOBCon.

    @Erin Hill Re: your question,”How do you find work by browsing websites and finding poorly written ones and then recommending your own services?”

    I’m assuming that if you’re targeting this niche, you have a firm understanding of properly worded content (i,e keywords, search engines, SEO) and enjoy the marketing aspect of writing. And you have your own blog and/or website right?

    Show (not tell) how you can help a prospective client. An overworked staffer, web designer, secretary, etc. trying to update a website doesn’t want to hear from some yayhoo that their content needs help without any suggestions to back it up. (See also Carol’s suggestions above). Show them how to improve their content. Make their life easier, and you will win a friend.

    Upon initial contact with your prospect, send an email that links to your expertly written website, specifically on the page where you ‘show’ samples of side-by-side comparisons of other content you’ve improved. (This can simply be companies you’ve made up.) All they care about seeing is what you can can for them.

    To find out if this is a good match for your writing skills try doing a few freebies. Ask friends with small businesses, “Hey, I’m expanding my writing portfolio. Would you mind if I practice on yours?” Most of them will be extremely grateful and will give you a glowing testimonial to post on your site.

    I highly recommend The Well-Fed Writer by Peter Bowerman at http://www.wellfedwriter.com for anyone doing freelance writing and staying-tuned to Carol’s blog.

  11. JJ Turner says:

    Hi, Carol, I’m looking forward to your teleseminar on finding good online writing gigs.

    My biggest obstacle is the low fees potential clients expect to pay for online writing. Even sophisticated business who’ve never hired a copywriter may honestly believe the going rate is $10 a page or post.

    My challenge is personal (it’s emotionally depressing) and tactical (do I aim to demonstrate value or find experienced buyers?).

    Thanks so much for your blog, Carol! I appreciate your generosity.

    -JJ Turner

    • Carol Tice says:

      When potential clients expect low fees…you’re swimming in the wrong client pool.

      Angie and I are going to teach people how to climb out of there and find the better-paying pools. I can’t wait! SO much information we are going to pack into that hour…more details about it on Friday.

  12. CJ says:

    Hi Carol

    Thanks for all of the excellent advice. I am new to the freelancing business and, as I wade through the morass of information out there, I find your posts the most useful. I hadn’t realized that LinkedIn had such great potential and I will certainly pay more attention to my LI profile. I would also be interested in advice from others about how new freelance writers can gather writing samples — you have to know someone to get started and that seems like the toughest point of entry into the business. Also, I agree with JJ Turner above about the low-ball pay rates being offered. Is that something that one should accept just to get the ball rolling?

    As ever, thanks for a fantastic web resource.

    Carolyn

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hi Carolyn –

      I don’t agree that you “have to know someone” to get started. I sure didn’t — you can read about how I first broke into freelance writing if you like.

      There are plenty of ways to start getting those first clips, without “connections.” I’ve written a bit about it in the past, and we’ll be talking ALL about that in the Webinar — and how to get away from those lowball payers, identify, and connect with the clients who are paying professional rates.

      I know a lot of people don’t believe it, but there is still great pay out there, especially on the business side. I have more than one client who pays $2 a word right now, and one of them is an online market.

      Whether you want to take some initial work at low rates is really your choice and depends on your own life circumstances and experience level. If you’re new, writing for low pay may be better than writing for no pay, or not writing, more to the point. You need to write a lot to get better, so it may be more important just to establish a habit of writing for a market first.

      The problem I find is that people take those initial low rates…and then many get stuck and never move up. They seem to come to believe that this $10-an-article world is all there is. It’s like their horizons shrink. It also seems like it’s a self-confidence crusher for many to be paid so little, so they end up believing they’re not deserving of real pay, so they don’t put themselves out there.

      That’s one reason I’ve advocated for saying no to low payers.

      Really appreciating all the questions about online writing here! This is really going to help me make sure the Webinar delivers exactly what people need to know.

  13. Sarah says:

    Thanks for another excellent post. I’ve been slowly working on getting my LI profile updated, and that is a great tip about keywords. Also appreciate the lead to the best quality writing groups because my initial scan revealed dozens of groups for freelance writers and editors – how to know which are the best??

    In addition to using LI, I’m looking forward to the upcoming lesson on finding work online. I live in a rural and economically depressed area. Although there are several dynamic small businesses that could use help with web site content, blogging, etc., most of them have very limited budgets. But, since I am a ‘newbie,’ I figure doing freebies, barters, and simply some low-paying gigs will be good for building my portfolio and learning the ropes.

    BTW, do you have a date/time for the teleseminar yet? I want to get it on my calendar so I can be sure not to miss it!
    Sarah recently posted..Coffee! We’re Lovers Again

    • Carol Tice says:

      Details are coming Friday on the Webinar!

      In general, bigger is better in groups — you want the biggest pool of people to ask questions of that fits your interests.

      I’ve heard this “I live in an economically depressed area” song before from many of the folks in my mentoring program…and here’s what I have to say about that:

      Stop thinking of yourself as living in X place, and as being tied to that place’s economy. ONLINE WRITING WORK IS A GLOBAL BUSINESS.

      I think I had a couple of years, around ’08 and ’09, when I did not have a single client from my own market. If you live in an area where business isn’t good, you’re going to troll for clients elsewhere. Many clients don’t care where you are and know how to use DropBox, Campfire, Skype, IM, and other collaboration tools to stay in touch. Those are going to be the clients for you!

  14. Laurie Boris says:

    Carol…this is excellent…thank you! I’m off to Linked In…
    Laurie Boris recently posted..Why I Won’t Follow You on Twitter

  15. This was very helpful! I hope you’ll write a post about how freelancers can use Facebook as well.
    Annie Bleecker recently posted..Coquette

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hi Annie –

      I think of myself as still pretty much a newbie on Facebook. My fan page is still pretty recent, I’ve just dabbled a little in their ads, and I know there’s LOTS more I could be doing with it. Maybe I’ll have someone do a guest post for us on all the ways to leverage it.

  16. Anne Wayman says:

    Thanks Carol… for demystifying linkedin… like others, I’ve been there a long time. This will help me really use it.
    Anne Wayman recently posted..30 Days of Writing Tips – Day 6 – Make Writing A Priority!

    • Carol Tice says:

      My pleasure! If there are any other wrinkles to what you can do with LI that I’ve missed, I hope someone will add to the info in the comments here.

  17. Rebecca says:

    I’ll play devil’s advocate for a moment with regards to LinkedIn. My experience with LinkedIn has been a bit different. I’m amazed by the lack of professionalism by some folks on LinkedIn, especially in the groups. Also, I was approached by a couple of guys who, I guess, were under the impression that LinkedIn is a dating website. While LinkedIn is touted as the ‘business and professional’ social media website, you still need to be vigilant and make the ‘right’ connections.
    Rebecca recently posted..When Freelance Writers “Can’t Write” This is What They Do

  18. Niki McKa says:

    At this point, I’m having to do catch-up education. I wrote technical stuff for years then had to take a sabbatical to fix my broken grandchildren that we got guardianship of. Fortunately for them, we got them at an early age and repairing the damage was much easier than it would of been if more time had passed. The youngest was 10 months old and his older brother was 34 mos. I’ve had them over two years now and can finally get back to writing. However, the industry doesn’t stand still and now I’m behind. Any and all tips and/or suggestions are more than welcome!
    Thanks, Niki

  19. Sherri says:

    I also signed up at LinkedIn some time ago and have not checked for jobs there.

    It sounds like this is a good place for jobs and just conversation or tips from other freelancers.

    I think I will go there right now and try these tips. I will let you know what happens.

  20. Anne Galivan says:

    These are some great tips. I’ve been on LinkedIn for some time, but I need to update my profile. I will also look into the groups you’ve mentioned here.

    One frustration I have recently had with LinkedIn is that a couple of months ago someone in Puerto Rico started claiming they work for my company. I have no idea who this person is, but they are listed on my business page as working for me! How does someone even get to do that? Shouldn’t the person owning the company have the administration of this page?

    LinkedIn has been VERY unresponsive regarding this. After my first complaint, I was sent an e-mail saying they would look into it. A week or two later I checked the ticket to see what was going on and it said the case was closed! I re-opened it and e-mailed them. They sent me to a complaint form to fill out. I’m still waiting for a response on that. The form I filled out specifically said that they don’t guarantee that they will remove the person regardless of what they find out. What?!

    For a “professional” site LinkedIn’s customer service is decidedly unprofessional. If they refuse to remove this person the only option I see is to remove my business page completely, and just leave my personal page up…if they’ll let me do that!
    Anne Galivan recently posted..3 Google Tools for Enriching Your Homeschool

    • Carol Tice says:

      That’s pretty weird!

      And you shouldn’t need two pages on LinkedIn…I just have my own Carol Tice page, that talks about what-all I do. So maybe just get rid of it.

  21. Susan says:

    I always tailor my LinkedIn invitations but every invite I have ever received has been of the generic variety. If it’s an acquaintance, I accept. Ditto if it’s that rare someone that might prove useful. I guess most of these strange invitations with no messages come from members of groups I nominally belong to.

    All the LinkedIn writers and editors groups I have looked into seem to be dumps for spam or self-promotion. Same with alumni groups and the groups for my geographical area–”business connection” and the like. There’s something about the kludgey LInkedIn interface that discourages moderators from paying much attention to the groups they create.

    If you do see someone new and interesting (that is, an editor) posting in a group, attempt to make direct contact right away. I saw an introductory post from the editor of several Hong Kong-based travel magazines in a travel writers group. I’m in Thailand, used to live in Hong Kong and wrote for some in-flights and guidebooks in the past. He must have been barraged with LinkedIn invitations and blocked all contacts within a matter of days. I researched his publications, dug up two of his other email addresses and sent an introductory letter with a few brief story ideas but never got a reply. Perhaps a bunch of people were way ahead of me. The effort/reward ratio is just so lopsided.

    Warning: just hopped into and out of a LinkedIn group called Content Writers. Looks like these are content farm writers or would-be content farm writers.

    • Carol Tice says:

      The quality of interaction on LinkedIn writer group forums can definitely vary widely…lotta blowhards and self-promoters and wannabes. I get a lot of feedback that that’s why writers are loving the Freelance Writers Den forums — everyone there is dead serious about their careers, there’s next to no marketing (occasionally I affiliate sell a product at most 1x a month, though less and less going forward)…and we have 4-5 pro writers answering questions regularly plus a half-dozen other Den moderators weighing in who’re at various career stages.

      I pretty much ignore all those LI generic invites. There are people who sit in there just trying to rack up more connections who’re going through all their group rosters and just inviting everyone in hopes of getting some hits. I actually turn down all the invites that aren’t from writers whose work I know well. That’s the only way the connection network is useful for referrals. I feel bad turning down people who say “I love your blog and see we’re in X LI group together, could we connect?” But I learned the hard way it only gums up the works to have fake connections that don’t represent a real relationship.

      Then you just get requests to introduce people to someone you don’t really know, and it’s awkward. ;-( So after a while I got pretty picky about who I’m connecting to. I need at least a dim sense of who they are and the sort of writing they do to think we should connect on LI.

  22. Penelope says:

    Thanks for the LI tips, Carol! I’ve been finding myself shifting over to LI, as I am wearing out on the constant scrolling on FB and some of the other social media. I am finding that companies have also shifted over here as well, so I’m following.

    I appreciate the tip about the LI blog tool. I already update one of my groups with my Scoops, but I will implement this one as well.

    I noticed that I had some noteworthy people looking at my profile, but didn’t think to contact them as you suggested! Now I can only scroll back so far, so I guess I missed ‘em! Darn. Live and learn! I’ll do this the next time. ;)
    Penelope recently posted..11 Simple Tips to Increase Writing – Keep Your Eyes on Your Own Paper!

    • Carol Tice says:

      Not sure, Penelope, but their method for adding your blog may have changed since I wrote this post. But there definitely IS a way to add it, and it’s a great idea to do so. ;-)

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