How to Land International Freelance Clients for 2015 — Now

by Carol Tice – 18 Comments

Young successful woman looking at worldmap with profile photos oBy Amy Dunn Moscoso

Are you losing out on local freelance clients because they don’t have the budget for freelancers or because other writers work for less?

You don’t have to limit yourself to local clients. Start thinking globally.

You can build a rocking list of international freelance clients — and secure work for 2015 — with a few simple steps.

Generate leads with global trade shows

Want to break into a new industry? Beef up your client roster? Targeting global trade shows can help you land awesome clients.

My past experience as an agency trade show publicist taught me that companies have:

  • robust trade show marketing budgets
  • urgent need for written marketing materials and press kits
  • time-starved employees who can’t write and work

Recently, I generated red hot leads by pitching global trade shows. I found a Siemens site listing energy tradeshows, selected three and pitched blog articles, brochures, LinkedIn profiles, and media kits to:

  • show managers (the person who knows everyone)
  • sponsors (with juicy budgets)
  • exhibitors (who want to get the best return on their investment)

How I’m getting gigs for 2015: Tradeshows often run a fall and spring version. I offered to handle both. Two leads have emailed their fall and spring requirements, and one even asked if I’m able to write up an industry awards submission in February.

Act as a Local Contact

Does your city, region, or country dominate an industry?

Here’s your chance to activate your PR knowledge. Pitch yourself to international companies attending events, meetings, or conferences as a local contact who writes appropriate:

  • press kits
  • social media campaigns
  • marketing materials

I recently landed a CEO speaker package with a CEO in France, who is presenting in Toronto. I also provided cultural dos and don’ts and Canadian references to help him connect with the audience.

How I’m driving work for 2015: I pitched myself as a Canadian Special Projects Writer. This company has work for year end in March and needs to communicate “in Canadian.”

Position Yourself as a Cultural Consultant

Are overseas companies setting up offices in your town? Here’s your chance to grab work before the local competition descends. Send an LOI that pitches:

  • city guides
  • a package on business etiquette
  • a family resources kit

I’ve landed this kind of work through an agency. During the research, I interviewed local business and government experts which resulting in landing these contacts as clients.

Lining up work for 2015: My family is moving to China, so I’m researching how to settle small children and import Ziggy, our mini-poodle, sans quarantine. I pitched an ongoing ex-pat life blog to five Fortune 500 companies in my new city that recruit North Americans. So far, I have one hot lead.

Secure your 2015 Income

Put an end to the freelancer feast-and-famine cycle and fill in your fall and spring schedule by going global. You may find that once you’ve added international clients to your portfolio, local contacts start banging down your door, too.

How do you target far-flung companies? Share your top tips in the comments below.

Amy Dunn Moscoso is a Canadian B2B writer who works with IT, SaaS, and small business-focused companies, publications, and entrepreneurs around the world. Drop by her blog to talk content marketing.

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140 Websites That Pay Writers in 2014

by Carol Tice – 22 Comments

Online markets that pay freelance writersBy Jennifer Roland

Way back in 2010, Carol decided to bust a move here on the blog.

As an advocate for writers seeking out good-paying work rather than writing for “exposure” or pennies, she decided it was time to start paying the writers who guest posted here.

Then, something really cool happened. Other bloggers started paying their guest posters, too. Some were inspired directly by Carol, and some blog owners just decided on their own that great content was worth paying for. So Carol gathered a list of those blogs as a resource for her readers.

But things on the Internet change fast. Fourteen months later, it’s time to post an updated list.

Our 2014 list of blogs that pay

Here is Carol’s fresh, new list of websites that pay at least $50 for guest posts. They’re listed alphabetically:

  1. Be a Freelance Blogger — Sophie Lizard hosts a contest six times a year for one guest blogger to win $100 for their post. The contest is judged on outlines, so you don’t have to write the post on spec.
  2. HouseLogic — This site operated by the National Association of Realtors pays $1 a word — Carol had an opportunity to interview their editor for an article for The 2013 Writer’s Market. If you’ve got a good twist on a shelter story and strong reporting skills, this could be a great place for you.
  3. Make a Living Writing — Carol pays $50 a post. Due to overwhelming response, though, she now only takes guest posts from students or grads of Freelance Writers Den or Jon Morrow’s Guest Blogging course.
  4. Patch  — AOL’s Patch.com, as of this writing, often pays $50 and up for short blog post–like articles. Patch closed many of its hyperlocal news sites at the end of 2013, so do a little research to see if there’s still a Patch near you.
  5. Read.Learn.Write. — Paying $50 a post after seeing Carol’s Problogger post about paid guesting in Feb. 2012. (We just got word that Read. Learn. Write. is not accepting guest posts.)
  6. David Worrell’s blog, Rock Solid Finance was the first niche blogger to jump on the bandwagon and start paying $50 for guests posts back in late 2010.
  7. SlickWP — Are you a WordPress pro? Then this might be a great place for you to write. They pay $50 per post plus a link back to your site.
  8. Social Alexis — This is actually a group of sites, including The Penny Hoarder and Brazen Careerist. Some of the sites pay $50+ or a link, so make sure you’re pitching a paid post and that the editor agrees on the fee BEFORE you submit your final work.
  9. Strong Whispers — This multi-topic site is paying $50 a post.
  10. Tuts+ — Tuts+ is owned by Envato, which used to run Freelance Switch. Carol guest blogged for Freelance Switch for quite a while. They pay around $75 for shorter posts, and can pay $150 or so for longer ones.
  11. The Work Online Blog — This site is all about how to run an online business, serve clients, and other topics related to the gig economy. They also pay $50.
  12. Your Online Biz — Darnell Jackson is paying $100 a post, so this is another great market to look at if you’re a pro at building your business online.

Not enough for you?

Other bloggers in Carol’s network have created lists of paying blogs — between this list and the ones linked below, that’s 140 potential guest post markets for you.

Even more paying markets

Two are by Bamidele Onibalusi of Writers in Charge, and one is by the above-mentioned Sophie Lizard of Be a Freelance Blogger. One is part of a larger market listing on Jennifer Mattern’s site, All Indie Writers. The final one is from the freelance-training site Matador — it’s a little older, but it lists a wide range of online sites and blogs that pay at least a bit.

Here are the links to grab those lists:

I compared these lists to make sure I didn’t overstate how many blogs out there are paying. And even when you ignore the duplicates, there are still 140 unique paying websites and blogs here.

Not too shabby. Hope these resources help you find more paying online markets!

Have you gotten paid to guest post? Tell us about your guest-blogging experience in the comments below.

Jennifer Roland is a freelance writer, and the guest-blog editor here at Make a Living Writing. She focuses on edtech, lifestyle topics, marketing and public relations, and content creation. Her latest book, 10 Takes on Writing, will be out in late 2014.

Your 7 Favorite Posts About Freelance Writing — So Far

by Carol Tice – 21 Comments

Seven great blog posts about freelance writingHey, writers!

Looking for a little summertime inspiration to get your freelance writing in gear?

Well, I noticed that my January roundup of the most popular posts of 2013 was the most popular post I’ve done here on the blog so far this year. Apparently, you find these best-of compendiums useful.

So I’m here to help with another handy set of popular posts — these are from the first half of 2014. I’m actually out in the Internetless countryside in Colorado right now, but wanted to keep you stocked with useful info to grow your freelance writing income while I’m gone.

Here are the seven Make a Living Writing posts that had the most readers the week they published:

  1. Why You Need to Go For Your Freelance Writing Dream Now
  2. What the Elance-oDesk Merger Means for Freelance Writers
  3. I Quit My Job to Be a Freelance Writer: What Was I Thinking?
  4. Writers: Soar Like an Olympian With These 4 Key Traits
  5. Use This Simple Tool to Move Forward With Your Freelance Writing
  6. Writing for Guardian Liberty Voice: 10 Writers’ Stories
  7. The 4 Worst Places for Freelance Writers to Start

Enjoy!

Carol


What was your favorite post about freelance writing this year so far?
Leave a comment and share a link.

 

 

 

How I Found Great Freelance Work on My Doorstep

by Carol Tice – 29 Comments

Freelance writing work comes to your doorBy Gwen Boyle

As a beginning freelance writer, finding your first clients can be overwhelming.

Should you start with publications or companies? Big or small? What’s your niche? How on earth do you reach out to these people?

It’s enough to make you crawl under the bedcovers and pray that clients find you there. But you know that’s not going to happen.

Earlier this year, after getting a couple of pro bono clips, I was figuring out how to find paying clients.

I joined the Freelance Writer’s Den, and discovered a bootcamp: The Step by Step Guide to Freelance Writing Success, which teaches writers how to start from zero, build a portfolio quickly, and start finding good first clients.

The first exercise taught me exactly how to start finding clients. Surprisingly, I didn’t have to look very far for freelance work.

I reconsidered my experience

I thought that freelancing was a chance to leave my resume behind. As a writer, I could write about anything! What did my experience matter?

However, I learned that it makes sense to start with what you know. The first exercise, identifying “low hanging fruit,” encouraged me to reconsider my experience, education, and passions.

After making lists of every job I’ve had, every course I’d taken, my hobbies, and my interests, I pinpointed the intersections between these lists and areas where I might find good clients.

I reached out to likely prospects

With helpful feedback from Den Mother Carol, I found two likely areas to focus on: education and environmental organizations.

I had resisted the idea of having a niche. However, picking a couple of areas made it easier to start sending letters of introduction (LOIs), rather than just thinking about it.

Concentrating on education first, I drew up a list of prospects. I started with the most daunting: large higher education publishers. While it felt great to start contacting people, I realized there was one little thing on my list that I hadn’t tackled.

There was somewhere that used freelance writers: somewhere that was local, and that I knew inside out.

I found a great client in an unexpected place

I had scribbled down “Alumni Office?” on my list, identifying my former university as a prospect. But I kept overlooking it when making my way through my LOIs.

I had spent nearly nine years at a university I loved, finally leaving with a PhD last year. I was keen to make a fresh start in freelance writing – but why had I ignored a potential source of work?

I’m not sure why it took me so long to see a client in my own backyard, but I bit the bullet and sent an email. To my delight, I got a positive response, had a lovely meeting, and landed some writing work with my old university!

I’m looking forward to working with them, and I’m amazed by my blind spot when it came to finding a local source of work.

Clients can be a lot closer to home than you think.

Have you found a client from your past experience? Let me know in the comments below.

Gwen Boyle is a freelance writer from Cork, Ireland. Discover resources for inventing your own job at Versatile Creatures, her blog dedicated to alternative and creative ways of making a living.
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