Magazine Editors on Twitter: 20 to Know + Tips to Connect
Carol Tice | 25 Comments
How to Meet Magazine Editors on Twitter. Makealivingwriting.com

How to Meet Magazine Editors on Twitter. Makealivingwriting.comMagazine editors can seem so unapproachable. Am I right? You send them a query, and nothing.

But there’s one place where many editors seem to be easier to connect with: Twitter. As someone who once got $6,000 of assignments from a tweet, I’ve always been a fan of trying editors on this platform.

If you call an editor, you know it’s going straight to voicemail, every time. Right?

On the other hand, asking a quick question on Twitter can be a useful workaround. Some magazine editors love Twitter, and turn out to be fairly approachable on there.

Interested to learn more? Let me give you my favorite question to tweet to an editor. I’ve also got a list of interesting magazine editors (online and traditional print) you might want to follow on Twitter:

Tweet this to magazine editors

There’s one query that I find many magazine editors are willing to respond to on Twitter. And it’s a question freelance writers commonly have — around which editor on a big masthead they should target for their query.

It goes like this:

Hi, I noticed you’re the [articles, health, managing, etc.] editor for X magazine. Would you be the right editor to pitch an idea about [Y topic]?

As you can see, this is a fairly innocuous question. It doesn’t require a lot of their time.

Their answer is either:

  • “Yes, I’m the one,” or
  • “No, that would be joe@joemagazine.com.”

Either answer helps you. If it’s them, you can respond to that editor and let them know you’re sending a pitch. When it lands in their inbox, hopefully your name rings a bell now.

If it’s Joe, now you have instant credibility. You can now start your query with, “Cindy indicated you’re the editor to send this pitch to.”

And BOOM! — you seem like you got referred over from the other editor. Nice!

  • What you don’t want to do to magazine editors on Twitter is pop up and try to put your whole query into a series of tweets. #justno
  • Or ask a long, complicated question that would take a lot of thought on the editor’s part. Keep it simple!

Now that you know what to say to magazine editors on Twitter, let me give you a starter-pack of editors to check out on there. Some of these were recommended to me, some are editors I know and follow, and others I turned up just to help you out.

20 Magazine editors to follow

There are two good reasons to follow magazine editors on Twitter:

  • They are a source of useful info for writers
  • You are stalking them because you want to pitch them

In the list below, I’ve only included editors who would be good for both cases. If they’re not very active on Twitter, then following or even tweeting to them is a waste of time. You can only win by targeting a tweet to an editor if that editor checks their Twitter!

Also want to point out, I scared these up with just a couple hours of research. (See my tip near the bottom on how I do it.)

Big tip: If it’s anything higher than managing editor, they’re probably not the right person to pitch — look lower down the masthead. I’ve included a few editors-in-chief here because I think their feeds are useful. And you could always ask them who’s the right person for your particular query topic.

OK — ready? Here’s an editor list to whet your appetite (listed alphabetically by publication name):

1.Cosmopolitan: Editor Farrah Storr (@Farrah_Storr) shares everything from job leads and mentoring opportunities to thoughts on race and culture, to podcasts from their Sunday Salon.

2. The Cut: Get fashion and pop-culture trends from president and editor-in-chief Stella Bugbee (@stellabugbee).

3. The Daily Beast: For hard-hitting news, try national editor Justin Miller (@justinjm1), who shares my nose for scandal.

Editors on Twitter: Justin Miller Daily Beast

4. Entrepreneur: Because I earned more on the digital side here than I did for the magazine, I’m steering you to digital editor Dan Bova (@danbova1). Also, he’s funny.

5. ESPN the Magazine: Loving deputy editor Chris Sprow (@ChrisSprow) as his interests are ‘Just about everything.’ Bonus points: He’s also a podcaster.

6. Game Informer: If you’re not familiar with this top-10 consumer mag, you’re not a gamer. Editor Andrew Reiner (@Andrew_Reiner) shares design, gaming, and culture news.

7. Harper’s Bazaar: Get style and fresh conversations on race from senior fashion editor Chrissy Rutherford (@chrissyford), who was recently featured in a ‘women who tweet’ influencers roundup by The Newsette.

Magazine Editors on Twitter: Chrissy Rutherford

8. The Hot Sheet: Co-founder and editor Jane Friedman (@JaneFriedman) is someone every freelance writer should know. As she says, “I know far too much about the publishing industry.”

9. Inc.: I had the pleasure of working with Laura Lorber (@lauralorber) back at Entrepreneur — catch her here now, as executive editor.

10. Parents: Editor in chief Liz Vaccariello (@LizVacc) brings a wealth of knowledge, as she’s also been an editor at Reader’s Digest and Prevention.

11. The Penny Hoarder: New editor Dana Sitar (@danasitar) is a fellow writer’s coach — so her feed is full of useful tips. This is also a great break-in market for newbies.

Editors on Twitter - Dana Sitar

12. Prevention: Sometimes, you hit an editor who wears many hats. My big score is Alyssa Jung (@AlyssaAJung) — she’s also a senior editor at Good Housekeeping, Redbook, and Woman’s Day! Cha-ching.

13. Self: One of the most prominent consumer mags to go all-digital last year, Self lives on — and editor in chief Carolyn Kylstra (@CarolynKylstra) shares everything from job leads to

14. Social Media Examiner: Who better to follow on Twitter than someone whose beat is social media? Lisa Jenkins (@LisaDJenkins) is the managing editor of this highly popular site.

15. Sports Illustrated: If you want to learn how to amass a large Twitter following, check out executive editor Jon Wertheim (@jon_wertheim) — he’s got 42K+.

16. Traveling Mom: Cindy Richards (@CindyTravelsOn) serves as editor in chief of this multi-author travel platform.

17. US Weekly: Get your culture fix with reactions and exclusive tweets from associate editor Nicholas Hautman (@nickhautman).

Editors on Twitter: News from Nicholas Hautman US Weekly

18. Vogue: Enjoy fun takes on the state of things from culture editor Alessandra Codinha (@ATCodinha).

19. Wired: Executive editor Maria Streshinsky  (@Mstreshinsky) is another one posting job leads, as well as sharing posts on tech and politics.

20. YES! Magazine: For upbeat and progressive thoughts, there’s Chris Winters (@TheChrisWinters), YES! senior editor.

Here’s how to easily find more editors

Boggled on how to locate editors on Twitter? I know, some people don’t use their actual name as their handle. Or they’ve got a middle name or initial in there, or just something random. So it CAN be baffling.

But…there is hope.

You can search on the publication’s Twitter handle…and then select ‘People.’ You’ll see a list of people who include the publication’s Twitter handle in their Twitter description…including folks who’re on the publication masthead. As you see here, with a search I did for PopSugar ‘people’:

Find magazine editors on Twitter: Popsugar people

Find and follow magazine editors

Hopefully, this list gives you a taste of how much info you might glean from following magazine editors on Twitter.

That’s not the only place to check them out, though. Recently, I conducted an interesting experiment in looking for LinkedIn influencers: I searched for the word ‘Editor’ in my contacts.

I turned up over 60 people. And that was just first-degree connections!

Some editors were at a different publication than I remembered. Some had been promoted. And that was without exploring what editors I might have as second-degree connections on there!

I think a bunch of new connection invites are in the offing.

You can do the same on Twitter — look through an editor’s followers to find more editors.

Happy tweeting!

Need help finding magazine editors? Leave a comment below, and let’s discuss.

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25 comments on “Magazine Editors on Twitter: 20 to Know + Tips to Connect

  1. Branda C Brumaire on

    Hi Carol,

    Great piece! I love the idea of tweeting the editor but I’m a little worried about reaching out with a pitch via twitter messenger. There are some that I have found that you can send them a direct message but I’m not sure if that would be professional. I had read somewhere that it’s better to develop a relationship before you start pitching them directly. What are your thoughts on this? Should we do it right away or engage with their post first?

    Thanks Again
    Branda

    Reply
    • Carol Tice on

      Branda — not suggesting you send them a full-blown pitch ON Twitter — just that you CONNECT. Start following them. Share their stuff. Comment on it.

      You can’t PM anyone on Twitter who doesn’t follow YOU, so you’ll be talking to them in the open — though if you make the tweet start with their handle with no period in front or other characters, only they will see it.

      The idea is to reach out there and see if they will respond, as in, “@editor — are you the right person to send a pitch about X at Y magazine?”

      From there, they’ll either not respond, or respond yes, it’s them and how to get in touch to pitch, or that it’s someone else, and refer you.

      Make sense?

      Reply
  2. Evgenia on

    Hi Carol,
    I would like to hear your opinion about a confusing situation, please:
    I found an editor and started following her on Twitter. However, I noticed that her tweets are very irregular and look more or less personal. However, when I followed the company she works for, the tweets looked professional and frequent.
    But how can I know who hides behind these professional tweets? As a freelance writer, isn’t my primary goal to build a relationship with an editor?
    Thanks,
    Evgenia.

    Reply
    • Carol Tice on

      Well, you can’t know, Evgenia. And you don’t really need to — if someone is posting on a person or company’s behalf, if there’s something interesting they get tweeted, they’ll send it to the right person at the publication.

      But my rule on social is if I’m trying to connect with an editor in a social channel, if it looks like they don’t use that channel much, I don’t bother to hit them there. I try to find one where they seem active. Hope that helps!

      Reply
  3. Evgenia on

    Hi Carol!
    Thank you for the eye-opening article!
    As a beginner Twitter user,I have a question, please:
    Let us say I’ve found an editor and I want to sent her the query you suggested : (“Hi, I noticed you’re the [articles, health, managing, etc.] editor for X magazine…”). But if she does not follow me, how can I send her a private message? Otherwise, all the world will see it..?
    Thank you for your answer,
    Evgenia.

    Reply
    • Carol Tice on

      Great question — that’s correct, Evgenia — you’re going to tweet to her where the whole world can see it. BUT… if you put their handle as the first thing in the message, without any characters before it, no one else actually WILL see it in their newsstream. So if you put “@editor — are you the right person to pitch for X?” in reality, they’re likely the only one who will see it in their feed. If you put “.@editor” — then it will appear to all.

      Reply
  4. Hannah on

    so grateful for this post!! I’m always looking to follow relevant people on social media that keep me up to date with both the publishing industry and current events (hello blog post ideas!). just went and followed all of the editors listed, thanks for sharing!

    -Hannah
    thepinkgeneration.com

    Reply
  5. CHRISTIE S GAHAN on

    Please clarify: ” I made more on the digital side.” at Entrepreneur. Were you writing articles that only appeared on their web site ? Or doing some other sort of work for them.
    Thanks.

    Reply
    • Carol Tice on

      Yes, I made far more blogging for them. Sadly, I gather their days of paid blogging by journalists have ended. But back then, I was doing 4 $100 posts a week for a while there, and 3X/wk for years.

      Reply
  6. Michelle on

    Hi Carol, I just read your blog on magazine tweets. I started out in 2016 wanting to write. I am a beginner, so what would you advise?

    Thanks,
    Michelle

    Reply
  7. Judith Norris on

    WOW! You are a veritable storehouse of information! And it’s good stuff as well! Thank you for your wonderful generosity!

    Reply

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