How I Make $5,000 a Month as a Paid Blogger

Over the past couple of years, I’ve seen the amount of income I make from blogging grow steadily. Some months now, it’s half my income. That can mean $5,000 a month or more from blogging.

How did I build a lucrative business as a paid blogger? Here’s how it worked for me.

  1. Start my own blog, which became Make a Living Writing.
  2. Promote my blog on Twitter and LinkedIn. Keep building my audience and learning about what makes a great blog post.
  3. Ask existing clients if they need a blogger, using my own blog as a sample.  Entrepreneur magazine says yes.
  4. I become their anchor blogger, posting three times a week. This was summer 2009.
  5. Many small businesses approach me after seeing my Entrepreneur posts and ask me to blog for them as well.

I thought it would be enlightening to give those interested in earning from blog-writing fees a look at what it takes to earn a decent living as a paid blogger. The short answer is: Be able to write a lot of very powerful, well-linked, properly formatted, well-researched, short blogs. Never run out of story ideas.

Learn as much about the technical end of blogging as you can, so  you can show clients you know the ropes. At this point, I’ve used WordPress, Blogger, Movable Type, you name it.

Then, pitch high-traffic sites and try to get on as a regular, paid blogger. From there, if you’re writing well, other clients who need help from a professional blogger will begin to find you. If you can understand what they need to say and the audience they are trying to reach, you can grow your stable of blogging clients.

Here’s a breakdown of my blogging activity for a typical recent month. Without breaking any confidences by telling you what any specific client pays, here is the amount of blogging I do for paid clients in a month:

  • 12 posts a month for Entrepreneur under my byline
  • 22 or so posts a month for BNET under my byline
  • 4 posts a month for a small-business-finance client, half-ghosted, half my byline
  • 4 existing blog posts rewritten for the same client, to conform to good blogging style, add images, links, etc.
  • 4 posts a month for another small-business-finance client – ghosted for business owner
  • 12 posts a month for a collaboration-software startup, mostly ghosted for their team.

Total blog posts: 58

Total pay: $5,100

Gawd, I’m tired just looking at that blog total! No idea how I do it. This figure, of course, doesn’t count the posts about writing I create for this blog…so you can add another 8-10 posts a month there. To sum up, I’m a blogging fool these days!

My point in showing you this is that even at decent rates, blogging is a grind. You have to create a lot of blogs to earn well. A background filing on daily deadlines is definitely a plus.

My other point is to say, don’t blog for $10 a post. There are living-wage blogging jobs out there. Anywhere a company or publication needs to talk to a specialized audience, there’s an opportunity. Blogging really can pay the bills.

Yes, this isn’t that moonshot way of earning that so many are dreaming of, where you monetize your own blog and make six figures on autopilot. This is an everyday, working-class sort of way to earn from blogging. Simply helping publications and companies communicate powerfully with their readers and customers.

While I really love writing long features, I’ve also kind of fallen in love with blog format. It’s short, sassy, fun, and connected. Guess that’s why I’ve ended up doing so much blog work lately.

Want to get paid for your blogging? Learn how to earn more as a freelance writer in my new learning community, Freelance Writers Den. All-you-can-eat live teleclasses and Webinars, e-courses,  forums, and much more.

 

 

Photo via Flickr user Mike Licht, NotionsCapital.com

  1. deirdrereid says:

    Thanks for sharing this. So you're averaging $88/post. Can you share the high and low rate per blog post? I assume you're being paid per post, but if not, how is the fee based? Also — yeah, full of questions — can you share your average time spent on a post. I'm guessing this may be all over the place, but any insight would be really helpful. Thanks so much!

  2. Cathy Miller says:

    Carol:

    Carol:

    You wore me out reading that, too. :-) I do blogging for pay, but it's all ghost blogging and all requiring a fair amount of research for the niche. Mine is more hit and miss and not anywhere near your volume. My per post is around $200-250 as they are longer and, as I said, require time for research.

    I tend to get most of my income from white papers, case studies and ghostwriting articles. I like your idea of having a minimum contract.
    My recent post Wordie- A Fun New Toy for Friday Lite

    • TiceWrites says:

      I love the rate you get, Cathy! As I said, this isn't all my income — I have strong work in articles and white papers as well.

      I've gotten as much as $300 a post in the past for blogs that needed reporting. It's best to think in terms of the hourly rate to figure out if it's priced right. I always shoot for $100 an hour…don't always get there! But aiming there.

    • Ahsan BT says:

      how do you people get more than 100 dollars per post? I am a freelance writer and work in Odesk.com. but i hardly find more than 3 dollars per article. Suggest me where to find highly paid jobs? Thanks

      Regards,
      Ahsan BT
      Ahsan BT recently posted..Creating VS Making of Money—II

      • Carol Tice says:

        Hint: Stop working “in oDesk.”

        • Katy Willis says:

          That’s a GREAT tip – IF you know where else to go, aside from another mill! Or if you know how to find and approach potential new clients!! Which maybe I, personally, will have more luck with once I manage to get into the Den! Haha! :)

          • Carol Tice says:

            It’s amazing how mills come to dominate peoples’ thoughts. All the markets that existed before the Internet are still there, plus more legit ones online that offer great pay, too.

  3. Nancy Goll says:

    Thank you! This was very inspiring. I have tons of editorial experience, but am new to blogging. Do your clients give you their own contract to sign, or is the contract something you've created? Or a mix?

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Nancy —

      In the case of my larger clients, they provided a contract. Smaller ones we just hammered out a one-pager together. I have a questionnaire I have clients fill out to help define their project so I can quote accurately, so we work with that.

      Blogging contracts are pretty basic — who owns the work? How many blogs a month of what length? Whose byline? Can my byline be a live link to my writer site? Who will come up with topics (key to know as that takes time).

      How long the contract is for (I try for 2-3 months minimum, mutually renewable), and payment terms (I like net 15 days).

      About 3 paragraphs will really do it.

  4. deirdrereid says:

    Thanks, Carol. This is very helpful. Wishing you a relaxing and enjoyable weekend!
    My recent post Does the Future of Membership Live at 501 Mission Place

  5. Erika says:

    Carol – thanks AGAIN for the very practical, in-depth and personal info. People always want to know the ins-and-outs, and "how much will I make?" Thanks for putting it out there!
    My recent post How does your business blog stack up Technorati survey

  6. Wow, this is a well put together blog. Great job:) I'm just getting started in the field of blogging and I really would like to make some money from it but have found myself not quite knowing what to do and stumbling along the way. Also, just curious about the art you chose, do you have an artist or do it yourself? I love it, its well, magical. Right up my alley:)
    My recent post In Need of a Fairy Godmother- Apply Within

    • TiceWrites says:

      I just got that graphic up recently…it's just from Flickr Creative Commons…see credit at the bottom of the home page.

      To me it says, "I love what I'm doing, earning money by writing on my computer." Which I do!

      Thanks for the compliments! I've been working hard on my blog usability and design — more on what I changed and where I learned what to do here.

  7. Excellent information, Carole. You rock!!

    One thing I have learned (the hard way :)) is to also include an estimate of the time to respond to comments on the various blog posts. That can eat up a good chunk of your day, as can administrative and billing duties when you have multiple clients.

    Although I love blogging, that's the reason most of my income still comes from instructional design, elearning using rapid development software tools, writing and editing training video scripts, and book royalties (from my own book and numerous academic textbooks I have written): the amount I make from blogging just can't hold a candle to the instructional design and textbook rates. (At least for me. But for someone who is much more well known, it's a different story.)

    Still, blogging offers myriad benefits that other types of writing don't. The biggest one is exposure. You don't get that with instructional design writing (at least not public exposure.) And it's that kind of exposure that can lead to many bigger and better gigs with impressive media outlets.

    Again, thanks for a detailed and interesting post! The great thing about your blog posts compared to many others is that you always provide relevant, meaningful detail, which I very much appreciate.

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Vicki!

      Thanks — I do try to provide really useful, on-the-ground reports on what it's really like out there in writing land.

      There's no doubt that responding to the community takes time. To me the secret is to blog for people on topics I really love, and then I enjoy checking in and responding, and it seems to go faster. But many of my blogs are ghosted now, so thankfully not my responsibility to manage the community.

    • Crista says:

      I have a few old blogs but they were personal. I’m trying to figure out what to blog about to make some income. A lot of things people blog about is what I was wanting to so its hard to decide with all the similar blogs out there. Any good ideas? I am a foodie if that helps. :)

      • Carol Tice says:

        Crista, the point of this post is to set up a blog so that it gets you paid gigs, while you’re waiting for your own blog to catch on.

        Food is still a great niche… I have a friend who’s killing with it over at macheesmo.com. Just need a niche angle and great recipes and photos!

  8. Excellent info! Thanks for sharing and showing us the realities of what it takes to be a full-time blogger earning a full-time income. It's nothing short of full-time work. :)

  9. John Wheel says:

    Wow, you're my hero. 52 blog posts a month?!?!? A sign of pure genius. good for you.

  10. Hey there :) Darren from ProBlogger linked this up on Twitter so I came to have a look :)

    Just wanted to ask, if you're averaging almost ten blog posts per day for various clients (including your own blogs), what's your average word count for your blogs?

    I get asked a lot by my boss what an average blog post length should be, but I can only tell her that it depends on her post, the content and ultimately the blog being written for.

    Do you have an average or does it depend upon the post / blog / your message?
    My recent post Blog Action Day 2010- Blogging For A Cause

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Sffarlenn —

      I'm not averaging 10 posts a day, thankfully! Think there's a math error there.

      I try to train clients that a great blog is 350 words. Most buy it. Some it's 500. If a small business owner tells me they want 750-1000 word blogs, I usually pass, because I think they probably don't know a lot about blogging yet, and I don't want to train them. Too much ramp time.

      Also, at $125 a 400-word blog post, that's still lower than my normal per-word rate for articles…so they need to be thinking in terms of short posts, because I'm not writing 1,000 words for that rate.

  11. I want to earn from blogging too but don't know where to start. I'm not sure if a degree is necessary or the skills would be just fine. To the author of this post, do you still put advertisements on your blog for extra income or do the companies you work with allow that to?

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Jouie —

      Well, I'm sure everyone breaks into paid blogging a different way…you can see how it worked for me in the post.

      As far as a degree, I don't have one. Hope that answers that question.

      I'm not sure I understand your question in the last sentence there. I don't currently have any ads asking people for writing work on my blog.

      I know bloggers who do that, though — don't know if it works for them. I always think the audience for my writing blog is totally different from the audience that hires me for paid blogging…but maybe I'm wrong.

      If anyone is advertising and getting clients off their blog with an actual ad, please weigh in below and tell us about it! I'd be curious to know more about whether that strategy works.

      As I say in the post, I get many of my clients off their seeing my other paid blogs. I also get clients from the SEO I've done on my writer site that makes it rank well for relevant searches for me such as Seattle freelance writer.

      But happy to hear how others are doing it. I'm sure there's more than one way to skin the cat. I wrote a blog a while back that you can get them like this: Look at local companies' Web sites and call the suckiest ones and ask if they need help keeping up their blog. Like shooting fish in a barrel. SO many businesses are at the point where they've just realized the power a blog could have to drive their business…and also realized they don't have time or ability to do it themselves. HUGE opportunity is out there.

      • I’ve been here only a few days, Carol, and already I landed 2 monthly contracts with 2 business owners (from my local area) to spruce up and maintain their sites. I took your advice (after I saw what you wrote about this somewhere else in The Den) and contacted both of them after noticing their sites were rather scrawny and obviously unattended – to say the least. One is a lumber yard and the other a NAPA Service Station. They both seemed happy and relieved that someone local had come along that could help them. One owner said he had received a few complaints already about their site, but was rather reluctant to deal with someone he couldn’t meet with face to face.

        I would love to post some of the few sneaky (but not unethical) strategies I employed to rein them in and get a decent contract – with your permission of course. I promise to keep it down to 1000 words. Maybe it can help other members in here.
        Joseph Rathjen recently posted..NYC Sick Pay Rule

        • Carol Tice says:

          Hi Joseph –

          Glad to hear the tips on here helped you land a couple of clients! Once you start researching business websites, it’s really like shooting fish in a barrel — so many need MAJOR help.

          As far as the guest post idea, please see my writers guidelines here:

          http://www.makealivingwriting.com/why-i-pay-writers

          I am currently only accepting guest posts from members or grads of my Freelance Writers Den community or Jon Morrow’s Guest Blogging course.

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Jouie —

      Well, I'm sure everyone breaks into paid blogging a different way…you can see how it worked for me in the post.

      As far as a degree, I don't have one. Hope that answers that question.

      I'm not sure I understand your question in the last sentence there. I don't currently have any ads asking people for writing work on my blog.

      I know bloggers who do that, though — don't know if it works for them. I always think the audience for my writing blog is totally different from the audience that hires me for paid blogging…but maybe I'm wrong.

      So if anyone is advertising and getting clients off their personal blog with an actual ad, please weigh in below and tell us about it! I'd be curious to know more about whether that strategy works.

      As I say in the post, I get many of my clients off their seeing my other paid blogs. I also get clients from the SEO I've done on my writer site that makes it rank well for relevant searches for me such as Seattle freelance writer.

      But happy to hear how others are doing it. I'm sure there's more than one way to skin the cat.

      I wrote a blog a while back that you can get them like this: Look at local companies' Web sites and call the suckiest ones and ask if they need help keeping up their blog. Like shooting fish in a barrel. SO many businesses are at the point where they've just realized the power a blog could have to drive their business…and also realized they don't have time or ability to do it themselves. HUGE opportunity is out there.

  12. Antti Kokkonen says:

    I'm not shooting for becoming a paid blogger, but settling more on the tech/strategic side of things. But that doesn't mean I don't enjoy good and honest advice on blogging and writing, as I do that on my own blogs anyway :) All in all, this was both informative and inspiring post. you worked hard, and got great results, and that's just awesome!
    My recent post Install and Configure W3 Total Cache in 7 Easy Steps

  13. Vernon says:

    Hey Carol,

    58 posts, that really is a lot.

    "I know how to stick my finger down my throat and throw up a post", I guess you sure do. I find it hard to keep posts short. I guess if you are posting for money, you've got to keep it short and quick.

    My recent post Doing It Passionately

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Vernon —

      If you find it hard to keep posts short…keep trying! Because short is what people mostly like to read on the Internet. You may feel like you just HAVE to deliver more, more, more…but conciseness is really prized these days, by editors, corporate clients, and readers.

      I've discovered the ideal post is about six paragraphs long, for most blogs (Copyblogger being an obvious exception). If you get to where it's 12 or 18 grafs, you can consider splitting it into a two-parter.

      • Vernon says:

        I'm aware of the 'how people read on the Internet' studies – as Jacob Nielson wrote "They don't".

        But my personal favorite blogs include things like Copyblogger and, when he still wrote stuff, Doshdosh, as well as various science blogs that go into great detail, such as 'Observations of a nerd' at Scienceblogs. Honestly, if I'm subscribed to a blog and it starts to become just short 10 liners, I usually unsubscribe.

        Of course, I don't read much of that stuff when I'm just browsing – I bookmark and read later.

        I hear what you are saying, and perhaps I've got to do some testing. I'll try first with splitting.
        My recent post Doing It Passionately

  14. Blog Tyrant says:

    This is a cool post. Thanks for sharing.

    I used to make a lot of my money from paid blogging but after a while I realized I was building up someone elses asset and had to rethink. I started outsourcing and taking a cut while working on other projects.

    Do you worry you don’t get time to build your own business?

    Tyrant

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Blog Tyrant — nice to see you over here!

      See my response to Diggy about my need to balance earnings I can get now versus building my own blog.

  15. matie says:

    This is probably one of the best 'how to make money blogging' posts I've ever seen out there.

    You would just laugh at the fact that I ghostwrite blog post on 15$ each, but that will probably end today LOL thanks to your information :)

    • TiceWrites says:

      Oh, I wouldn't laugh at all, matie — I know plenty of writers caught in this trap. I mentor writers who are serious about moving up, so I hear these stories all the time.

      That's why I write these posts. I want people to know there is other work out there that pays better. You have to be willing to get off Craigslist and go find it, but it exists.

    • lifespolitikin says:

      Hi Matie,

      I completely understand where you're coming from, being paid so little for writing so much! I'm in that situation right now. However, the situation I'm in has promise to change.

      I came across Tice's website through copyblogger, and my perspective on my writing has completely changed. I picked up all the books on her site that were available at the library, including "Why Now is the Time to Crush It"…I've just launched my own blog. Granted, no posts up but the hardest step is overcoming your fears and taking the first step.

      Thanks Tice for your advice, and Matie there is always a way to move forward :) Good luck!

      • TiceWrites says:

        Not sure I totally follow, lifespolitikin…I think most readers here would consider making $5K a month for blogging a dream come true, based on some of the rates I've heard out there. I've never worked for under $50 a blog like many do.

        But thrilled to hear you're feeling empowered, reading up, and getting ready to launch your blog. If you want to ramp it to success fast, you might consider getting involved in A-List Blogger Club. I've gotten so much out of my membership it's unreal.

      • TiceWrites says:

        PS – next time you visit, please sign in with your human name…we try to keep it real here on the Make a Living Writing blog. You're lucky you didn't end up in the spam bin. IntenseDebate is kind of vigilant about these kind of things.

        • lifespolitikin says:

          Hi Carol, I was talking to matie when I was saying how I completely understand about getting paid so little to write (not the 5k you earn from blogging). Yes, $5,000 would definitely be a dream come true for my writing career.

          Apologize about not signing in, didn't know I had to do that (just learned something new!). — Thanks, Ahlam

  16. Diggy says:

    Heya,
    Thanks for sharing this. It's perfect to show that people who are making minimum wage or who are unemployed are able to generate $5000 a month in income, that is a big step up for a lot of people.

    I'm not even close to making that amount of money from my own blog, but I could never write 58 blog posts a month for my income. I would burn out after 1-2 months if not sooner. The problem is that the model is not scalable. You stop blogging…you stop earning.

    Would it not be much better to write 58 blog posts as guest posts for your own blog, and grow your traffic massively?

    Sure it'll take you a few months to get somewhere with your own blog, but eventually you could be making $5000 a month or much more with much less effort.

    I really respect you for writing so much, you inspire me!
    Best
    Diggy
    My recent post 5 Positive Benefits of Kindness

    • TiceWrites says:

      Um…well, I don't recall saying anything about previously making minimum wage.

      I started freelancing after leaving 12 years of staff-writing jobs. So I guess I was unemployed when I started in '05…but I had some experience under my belt. It took maybe six months to ramp my business.

      I have to constantly balance my desire to build my own blog and writing-advice business with my need to feed my family of five all on my own, while my husband builds his budding Web-video business.

      Things are starting to tip my way…and as it happens, think I'm going to be cutting my paid blogging down — not necessarily because I'm making millions through this blog now (ha!), but because I'm seeing more good-paying article opportunities these days. And it takes less time and is more enjoyable to write two $1,000 articles. So that's why I wanted to do this now, because I'll probably be making more from articles in the coming months.

      But I wanted to show how much you can make in blogging for others. I think too many hitch their star to the blog-monetizing wagon and aren't ever going to earn well from that, or maybe it'll take a couple years to get there at least…but meanwhile, they could write for others and pay some bills, if they seek out decent-paying blog gigs.

      I have some strategies I use that enable me to write that volume of quality blogs in a month…and I think I'll have to write a follow-up post to talk about them. Thanks for giving me a great suggestion for another post!

  17. Krista says:

    Very helpful post! Thanks! So in your opinion, is writing for Examiner.com a waste of time b/c of the low pay or is it good enough to have the wide circulation?

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Krista —

      It's good enough…if you don't need to earn any money from the hours and hours you would spend writing for Examiner.

      If you read through this site and my posts on WM Freelance, you'll know that I am of the opinion that anyone who is serious about making a full-time, decent living from freelance writing should avoid the mills.

      Ask yourself this: On Examiner, you could get great exposure…of the self-edited stuff you quickly write because you're making like 5 cents an article. The quality of that likely isn't going to be super-great. How would that help your writing career?

      In talking with writers who do this sort of thing, the ones I've found where it worked best is where they have a different business they are promoting on Examiner or Ezines or similar site — so they're airing their expertise in the articles, which then makes clients hire them to be their business consultant, animal trainer, lawyer, or whatever.

      I haven't noticed it works that great for writers, though.

      You might want to read this: 7 Reasons Why I Won't Write a $15 Blog.

  18. Your post on Copyblogger was superb.

    I'm amazed you're capable of writing so many blog posts within a month. It's remarkable.

    How long does the average post take you? How many hour days are you working to fulfill this quota?

  19. quicklysilver says:

    Thank you for sharing your knowledge. I am just starting out in this and I would like to earn some money blogging, but more specifically going down the line of humor, comedy, rants. If you or anyone could offer up some help or information I would be greatful.

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Quickly —

      I think being a paid blogger in the humor/comedy/screed type category is a lot more difficult. Most businesses want a tone that's different from that.

      But you're certainly free to build your own site and monetize ebooks spun out of your funny blogs…look at icanhascheezburger for a great example.

  20. diane says:

    Great article and gives me something to aspire to. I am a ghost writer for several different blogs in my niche and while I dont make what you do it is growing and leading to other jobs like copywriting, articles etc.

    Yes, blogging takes a lot of time to do it well and you better choose a topic you know since coming up with ideas is a requirement. In my opinion blog posts should range from 200-400words…anything else becomes an article. At least one pic per blog is helpful for SEO rankings along with the always required links etc. I, too, enjoy the short snappy and personalized writing. Hardest part is getting others to realize the importance of regular and consistent blogging to improve their sales and make them appear to be experts in their field but it is coming along. Loved your post and when I hit $5100 per month I will let you know.

    • TiceWrites says:

      Definitely stay in touch!

      My thing is, if a client won't agree to a regular posting schedule, I'm not interested. They have to do at least once a week. Otherwise, I know it won't be successful, and I want it to work so they'll refer me!

  21. Perry says:

    And if you wrote for twice as many sites (what would that make, 4 blogs; 6-8 hours a day?), you'd make six figures a year.

    Hot damn. :-)

    And if you wrote for three times as many sites, you'd be, well…dead!

    Nice post.

    Bloggers like JohnChow.com and ShoeMoney.com have brought in a lot of readers in the past years because they showed in detail (well, almost) how and where they made their money.

    Where did the rest of your comments go???

    • TiceWrites says:

      It seems like my new Intense Debate plug-in is concealing my replies…not sure why. Working on it! You have to click on the "1 reply" link at the end of each comment to see them now, which I don't like. Will get it fixed.

  22. scottkenemore says:

    But are your posts awesome? Are they daring and challenging? Do you write about what you adjudge terrible and think sucks? (I do that last one a lot.) I think these are important too.
    My recent post Simon Pegg and “Zombies” in Fable III

    • TiceWrites says:

      I try my best to make them awesome…or my clients will not keep me on long.

      On some of them, I do have a chance to call out what sucks…kind of one of the thrills of BNET, it's all about that.

  23. @dkanenh says:

    Thanks, Carol. I've been following you online now for a week and you've posted two topics that have been more helpful than some of the other groups I've followed for months.

    I'm going to propose a blog for one of my editorial clients but don't have my own blog to show them. I just believe I can do it because I do a good job for them now and know their business. Am I being naive?

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi dkanenh:

      It's so gratifying to me to hear that you feel like I'm delivering high quality, useful information…because that's the whole goal around here. Otherwise I could spend these hours watching Galactica reruns with my teen or something…

      Are you being naive pitching yourself as a blogger when you don't have a blog? Possibly.

      Should you do it? Why not! All they can do is say no.

      One possibility — have you made some really decent comments on someone's blog that might be a good sample? Even that might show you understand the format.

      But generally, I'd say get your blog up there! Having my personal blog is what enabled me to land the paying gigs in blogging. It's really your calling card.

  24. Hajra says:

    Hey,

    Quite a lot of information.
    I wanted to ask you about sites or publications that take in student/anchor/guest bloggers. I am new to blogging and would love to understand the concept of such. you say you were an anchor blogger so I thought it would be best to ask you!

    Thanks

    My recent post 360 degrees

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Hajra —

      Good question!

      I think about nobody gets any kind of blogging gig without their own blog. That's your audition piece. It show you both understand the format of blogs and the technical issues of how to work in a blogging program, adding images and links to stories.

      Many sites welcome guest bloggers — some even have a tab for it or writer's guidelines for how to submit. I personally have a open audition going on this blog on a post which also includes my guidelines.

      There are many, many opportunities to blog for free or very low rates such as $10 a post, out there. If you need some experience, find a site with a topic that interests you and do several months' worth of posts for them. At that point, you should have a strong sample from which to pitch better-paying sites. Like everything in business, it's a ladder you climb — you start on the bottom rung and work your way up.

      How do you move up? You write your way there, with the quality of your posts.

      If you have journalism or previous publications experience, you should be able to advance rapidly. Don't forget that businesses also need bloggers — huge opportunity there.

  25. TiceWrites says:

    I'd like to apologize that this particular post seems to have a technical problem — all the replies are collapsed. I can't figure out why — all the other posts they show. But if you're looking for answers, click on where it says "1 Reply" to see the responses.

    Sorry about that folks! It's life with plug-ins…

  26. Perry says:

    Not to take this great post off its track, Carol, but I read one of the replies on whether it is best to work on one's own blog or to keep writing for others.

    Sometimes I wonder which is the best.

    Let's get real here, it takes time and especially advertising dollars to get a blog to the point where it makes enough money to pay the bills. It's not posting in other blogs, and other free ways.

    Shoemoney (Shoemoney.com) is one of the few who tells the realities of it all. Which is why I admire the guy so much.

    Some may say that once you get the blog to the point where it can make money to pay the bills, it is basically on auto pilot. You just write a few blogs a week, and make money off of an e-book you wrote, the ads, and other things, like affiliate links.

    But my thinking is that there is much more to it than just that.

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Perry —

      This is a topic I explore in my ebook in some detail.

      I think studies have shown that the vast, vast majority of bloggers do not earn even a subsistence living from their blogs. Not that you shouldn't try to do it, but it can take years to ramp to where it supports you, even for those with luck, massive writing skills, marketing savvy and persistence.

      Which is why, like many, I see paid blogging for others as a great opportunity. It's money in the hand, to pay that grocery bill, this week. Personally, I need quite a bit of that with a family of five. I also find it pretty fun!

      To me paid blogging is an opportunity where many, many writers can earn, where blog monetizing is a bit of a diceroll. And ramping your own blog takes THOUSANDS of hours, let me testify. Where I can write four blogs for a client in half a day sometimes and make $500. So on an hourly-rate basis, I think looking at having some guaranteed paid-blogging income is a good thing.

      Get what you're saying — obviously, it takes time away from building your own blog. But my kids can't eat leaves while I work on becoming a blogging superstar.

  27. Perry says:

    Continued….

    It does take advertising to keep new readers coming in at a level to replace the ones who stop reading after awhile, which means more money out the door.

    He may make more money than a writer, but much of that goes towards advertising.

    Plus, not as many visitors buy as one would think. On top of that, does the blogger put in as many hours writing for his own blog as a writer who writes for other sites would???

    A writer such as yourself, Carol, can easily make, say, as an example, $2,000 a week take home, and work 40 hours a week. But, one wonders if it isn't the same with a blogger who claims to have X amount of daily readers.

    Or maybe he has to work more hours, and he isn't making as much money….

    And what other pros and cons are out there?

    Hmmmm….

    Pretty confusing on which way really is the best.

    I don't know, maybe that would be a good subject to write on? I haven't seen any articles on that subject, sooooooo….

  28. saji says:

    Very inspiring post newbies like me!

  29. Paul Novak says:

    Thanks for demonstrating how it really works Carol. There are a great many ways to go about monetizing your writing skills. Producing thrugh sheer number of pieces is really a good one if you can turn them out quickly. Blogging makes that easier because of the preference for short pieces reduces the need for pretty much everything from research to editing time. I greatly prefer long pieces and so am working towards a different niche, but being a paid blogger is certainly something to consider.
    My recent post Have You Forgotten Real Freelancing

  30. jp manching says:

    I also have blogs which earns almost $100 for month, I just started a year ago and I am going to continue these blogs because it increases my income as it age. It's really fun to have something like these things add up our salaries and even making more than our salaries.

    • TiceWrites says:

      I'm going to take a guess here and say you're not based in the U.S., jp, where you'd need more than $100 a month to be making more than your salary. Or most folks would, anyway.

      At this point, I'm sometimes seeing more revenue than that per day, and it is a great feeling. Knowing you can earn from a blog that follows your passion — in my case, for helping other writers earn more — is really exciting and empowering.

  31. TiceWrites says:

    For everyone who asked questions about how to crank a volume of quality blogs to earn at this level, I've done a followup post that fills you in — so take a read.

    • Jamie says:

      Hi. I’m not sure if you’re still tracking this post or not, but many of the links you’ve posted in the comments just link back to this post. I wanted to read the follow-up post you mentioned about cranking out a lot of quality blog posts, but the link just comes back to this page.

      Is there something up with your plug-in? Thanks!

  32. Anne says:

    This post inspired me to write to a high-profile company that I thought would benefit from a blog. I told them how a blog would benefit them and expressed my interest in writing for them. Guess who there new blogger is!? Thanks for the inspiration!

    • TiceWrites says:

      It is so awesome to have your success story on here Anne!

      After I filed this post, I sort of had an attack of insecurity. Should I really be sharing this much information about my earnings? Now I'm glad I did. Real-life information on getting paid helps people get it and move up to better pay.

      Congratulations on your gig! This comment made my day.

  33. Barbara says:

    I am going to pursue blogging this year with more vigour! I’ll be reading you and learning and typing. Thank you for you’re posting and inspiration. I am a Decorative painter, Mom and budding photographer. Perhaps I will add professional blogger to my list in 2011! I built my blog this past year but have not been consistent in posting (or my spelling). I love your comments and your honestly.
    You’ll be hearing from me again.
    Barb

    • TiceWrites says:

      Hi Barbara —

      Great to see you over here on my blog! I say go for it with the blogging. If you have the time and can put a little focus on it, maybe you could use it to get more painting or photography clients.

  34. Tim says:

    The numbers ($) are awesome but the model doesn't scale (no offence intended) until you start accommodating your IP into courses, ebooks etc.

    • TiceWrites says:

      Oh, no offense taken — that's exactly why I've quit one of my bigger paid blogging gigs since writing the piece, to focus on more time-efficent article writing, and on my own IP such as the Webinar mentioned above.

  35. Steve says:

    > Are you blogging for pay?

    Indirectly, yes. Blogging generates leads for my business by driving traffic to the site and establishing credibility. Each lead has a value based on the number of leads we can successfully convert and turn into new business. So, when people ask "how do you guys stay so busy?", the answer is "we have plenty of leads".

    There are many business owners who can't write. Finding them and convincing them of the value of a blog as a lead generation and credibility tool can result in some ongoing writing gigs. If I couldn't write, I'd hire someone in a second.

    My recent post Do Group Homes Harm Austin Neighborhoods

    • TiceWrites says:

      Right on, Steve —

      I personally have found blogging for small business to be a nearly limitless opportunity. SO many businesses have just hit the point where they realize they could use a blog to grow their business…AND they also realize they are never going to have the time and/or skill to create compelling blog posts on a regular basis in addition to all their other responsibilities at their business. They often also don't really know how social media works and need someone to help them with that too. Adding social-media consulting to the blogging package can add another few hours at $100 an hour or more to the account.

      I've set a limit of doing 3-4 clients at a time because I want to leave room for article assignments, too…otherwise I could have many more of these type of clients! Finding prospects is as easy as surfing the 'Net and seeing who doesn't have a blog that has a high-value product or service, where it could really grow their income to have a blog.

      • Steve says:

        Right, and the challenge is getting business owners to understand the long term return on investment that comes building up a valuable web presence over time. Talking to some old plumber about how you can literally think of dozens of relevant blog topics off the top of your head and how those topics will drive traffic, establish credibility and cause the phone to ring can be a tough undertaking. They understand yellow page ads, postcards and other "old media", but they often don't understand how a blog works long term.

        The writers who can not only write but who can also sell the value of good web content will be able to find work and make money.
        My recent post Do Group Homes Harm Austin Neighborhoods

        • TiceWrites says:

          I don't know if blogging really would work for plumbers…but it seems like it's very effective for everyone in professional services — lawyers, business-finance professionals, accountants, business service provides, pr pros, etc. A blog goes a long way to help them seem accessible and approachable, and can show their expertise. All my small-biz clients are in these types of niches.

  36. jenniferbruni says:

    hi Carol. I've been a freelance writer for 8+ years now, mostly corporate and financial gigs. Your post gave me a lot to think about…not sure I can grind out so much content in such a short time, but maybe letting go of the perfectionist/eternal editor in me would help. Also just doing it would probably do the trick! Based on what I'm hearing here in the Boston area, I think there are a ton of small businesses out there who are very conservative and afraid of cyberspace. They want to get out there but don't know where or how to start; which could be a good opportunity for writers like us. I'm thinking "social media consultants" in terms of hand-holding these types of clients. Just a thought.
    I started blogging in November as a way to express myself more creatively; so far I've had a very positive response. It's a baby step, but it's fun.
    If you have a chance, and you're not too blogged out, please check it out sometime: http:jenniferbruni.wordpress.com.
    Thanks and take care! happy blogging – Jennifer

  37. @msjulicious says:

    Thanks for the tips! We all can use a little help in this economy.

  38. Wow, I didn’t even know you could earn so much by blogging for clients – incredible!

    I’ve been blogging for over a year now, and I think I just might start expanding my reach. This was a really motivating article – thanks for sharing it!

    I’ll definitely have to start looking and building my writing portfolio. I have a few posts already that I think would work well as samples. :)

    Christina
    Christina Crowe recently posted..6 Questions- 6 Answers – Happy New Year!

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hi Christina –

      It can be done…but man, were my arms tired! Since writing this I’ve rejiggered my client mix a bit to more articles and fewer blogs. But there is plenty of paid-blogging work out there.

  39. Catrise says:

    I’m inspired! Thank you tremendously for this post. I burned out of corporate American two years ago and dreamed of my own freelance contracting business but gave up that hope quickly. Reading your post, I’ve decided to pick up my blogging mantle again and pursue this dream once more. My little personal blog has been a mess, but this post of yours has already steered me in better directions than any others I’ve read. I’m a subscriber now. You rawk! :D

    • Carol Tice says:

      Well thank you! This post has been one of my most popular. I hope everybody reading it goes out and gets some great business blogging clients, because the pent-up demand there is HUGE.

  40. perry rose says:

    Hey Carol…I forgot to ask you…

    …how many hours per week do you put in to do that many articles?

    And how can you come up with so many ideas for so many articles, month in and month out?

    Excuse me if I missed it if it has already been covered.

    Thanks in advance. :-)

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hi Perry –

      I’m the idea queen. I’m never, ever out of ideas. If you missed my Copyblogger post on ways to come up with ideas, take a read.

      The answer to the hours was…a lot. Which is why at this point I’ve gone back to more article writing and fewer blogs.

  41. Susan Payton says:

    Carol–
    So glad I found you through Tree.com (I write there too)! I recently shifted back to writing after running my marketing/PR firm for 5 years. The thing I’ve been surprised at is that there ARE people willing to pay more than $15/article. One potential client offered that and I told her my rate and she agreed to it, so you just never know.

    I’ll definitely be lurking here!
    Susan Payton recently posted..Where I Am Right Now

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hi Susan –

      Guess I have the opposite reaction — I’m surprised there are people left who still think they can get something usable for $15! Rates have been rising for over a year now.

      Good for you in coming back with a professional rate. So many writers don’t earn what they could simply because they take what they’re offered and don’t negotiate.

  42. jeulyanna says:

    You really impressed me, to the MAX! You inspired me to continue doing what I know I’m best at: writing (although I’m still struggling.) There is so much to learn…and the great news is, it’s from a real person with a great inspiring story! I like the way you write — the conversational style – which makes it feel like we’re friends a long time ago– and you’re helping me move up the ladder one step at a time! I am one of your regular readers now!

  43. Wow, this is really interesting stuff. I’ve been blogging for 1.5 years just as a hobby, even doing free guest posts for more traffic. How do I make the transition to looking for paid clients?
    Roy Marvelous | Cruisesurfingz recently posted..5 Sinful Ways To Enjoy Paris ( Without Having To Sell A Kidney )

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hi Roy –

      Thanks for coming to my blog!

      There’s quite a bit on how to do that here on this blog…and there’ll be a whole unit on earning from your blog and using it to find paying gigs in my new community, Freelance Writers Den…check it out. Folks on the waiting list are getting in starting this week.

  44. Connie P. says:

    How you manage all those blog posts in a month, and what rate would you recommend for someone starting out. I’ve done a slew of blog posts for a private client, but for less than $10 a post. I’m looking to do blogging for private clients and was thinking of $10 or more per post as rate, but after reading your blog, I’m wondering if I’m selling myself short.

    • Carol Tice says:

      Wonder no more — you’re selling yourself short.

      If you’re at under $10, think $25 or better. Once all your clients are there, start looking for $50 a post clients. And so on…

      Finding better-paying clients involves marketing your business proactively, rather than simply feeding off whatever ads Craigslist is serving up today.

      • Connie P. says:

        Thank you, Carol. I’ve been rummaging through eLance and Odesk jobs and was getting quite frustrated seeing all those jobs requiring so much and paying so little. I was worried about pricing myself out of a job, but at the same time I need to make a decent living, and I know people who are getting much more than what a lot of content mills pay. Right now, I primarily write for Demand Studios and LIVESTRONG because they pay more per article. I also do articles and blog posts for a private client. I LOVE blogging, so I found your post about blogging for money very helpful. I finally made the leap and signed up on WordPress so I can do my own blog and go on from there.

  45. M says:

    I’m currently blogging for pay, but it’s not my main source of income. I’m only getting $10-$20 per post, but it’s on an easy topic that I absolutely love, so I’m willing to accept the low pay.

    I’m made as much as $50 per blog when I ghostwrote for a financial site, though, so blogging definitely has the potential to turn into a lucrative profession if you find the right clients.
    M recently posted..An Introduction, a Warning, a Vent…and God Only Knows What Else

  46. Although I think I have a fairly professional blog with a lot of quality unique articles, I am not making enough money yet. I started blogging almost 2 years ago, although I have only been taking it seriously for 12 months out of this. My monthly income is only from Adsense yet. I want to give it another 2 years. I am confident that by then I will start to earn enough to take it up as a full time career.
    Internet Marketing Blogger, London recently posted..LinkedIn – Eight Reasons to Join LinkedIn

    • Carol Tice says:

      Adsense isn’t a winner for most bloggers…you need to diversify your revenue streams. Create products. Hold classes. Affiliate sell good stuff on higher commissions. This is basically what’s worked for me in a nutshell…along with blogging for pay for others, which is still a big earner for me.

  47. SimeyC says:

    Wow – it’s funny that while you say $5000+ is a grind – the majority of online writers (amateur) would be happy with $500+; thanks for putting online writing into perspective for us all!
    SimeyC recently posted..Seekyt – another good revenue sharing site.

  48. melody says:

    Wow!..Awesomeeee…$88/post?, $5000/month…can you help me on that?can you hand me over..let say i’ll be your side kick!:):)
    melody recently posted..My Baby Can Talk Review & Coupon Code

  49. Nels says:

    this is very informative, thanks for posting this. i have been trying to earn from my blog, but to no avail. i will definitely follow your tips.

  50. Malok Mading says:

    It is really great hearing such a honest confession from a top blogger like Carol. Thanks a lot for sharing with us. It is inspiring allow one to do more on the Internet.

  51. Genie says:

    Wow! That’s quite interesting. I also want to have that income per month but I just need a little more time to learn all those thing about blogging. You greatly inspires people who aspire and dream of something just the way I do.
    Genie recently posted..skin tags

  52. It is very wonderful reading an advice from a top and highly paid blogger like you Carol. You’re post will inspire and help new bloggers out there with a question on their minds, “How do I start blogging?.” Thanks a lot for sharing with us.
    Matthew Garrett recently posted..WarriorForum WSO Offers – Good Or Bad?

  53. dhanna says:

    Blogging really makes money. But it all depends on how you promote your articles to go viral. Thanks for the tips!
    dhanna recently posted..Benefits of remodeling your bathroom

  54. Hi Carol,

    Gosh, this is the kind of encouragement that I needed today! Look at that whooping figures, who said blogging couldn’t pay the bills! ;)
    Jonha Revesencio (@jonharules) recently posted..Is All Social Media Equal?

  55. So inspiring! One of the person that prove that there are money in blogging! Informative!
    Christian Esperar recently posted..4 Useful SEO Tips To Get High Ranking For Your Website

  56. Athena2011 says:

    I’m also a blogger but never earn this much. I’ll follow your suggestions here. Thanks for sharing!
    Athena2011 recently posted..Cabin Stewardess USA

  57. Athena2011 says:

    Earning $5,000 in blogging is not a joke. Love that there are people who are generous in sharing these ideas.
    Athena2011 recently posted..Motorcyle Mechanics New Zealand

  58. Shella says:

    woot! i need to earn as much as 5k. i know it’s not gonna be that easy though. but i need it badly because i’m planning for a trip!
    Shella recently posted..Holiday Accidents Compensation Claims

  59. Carol, there are so many comments that I could not read through them all! I’m curious about how many hours per week you spend writing. Half your income is from blogging, so how much time do you spend weekly on that? Then how much time on other things? I’m just trying to figure out what is realistic to expect timewise for writing different sorts of things. I’m heading back into the nonprofit letter writing market (hopefully) and don’t have 50 hours a week to spend writing while also teaching my kids. I have maybe 15 good writing hours per week. Thanks for your response!
    Kerrie McLoughlin recently posted..Clean Up Your Dog’s Poop, Moron!

    • Carol Tice says:

      Well, my target rate is $100 an hour, so if you hit that you could make up to $1500 a week. I try not to take more than an hour to write a typical blog post that doesn’t require an interview, and is just off my knowledge and/or recent news topics.

      Between my freelancing and this blog and Freelance Writers Den I was working a LOT of hours for about 18 months there…now it’s getting back to a more of a 40hr week type thing.

      The many hours BNET required caused me to drop them eventually — I found it more time efficient to do more articles and cut back on blogging after a while.

  60. Hi Carol I just found your site and really like all the advice you give! Thank you for sharing about your blogging life!
    Matt and Heather Peterson recently posted..A Couple Celebrations

  61. Thats the power of the internet,the amazing wonders of how online marketing and e-commerce in particular can help anyone realise their dreams.It proves the point that there are so many people making a living online doing what they enjoy most,and blogging or writting is just one of these many avenues.

    Thanks a lot for the post,it really inspired me and i hope a lot more will be inspired by it.

  62. Latha says:

    I used to write for $2 and $5.. No wonder I ended up frustrated and had absolutely no time for my kids..
    Latha recently posted..Duplicate Content versus Syndicated Content – Myths Busted

  63. Utibe Etim says:

    Am highly inspired by this article. Am just an ordinary blogger earning around $1000 from adsense every month and I hope to get to that level you are one day.
    Utibe Etim recently posted..Airtel Nigeria Launches 3.75G High Speed Broadband Internet Services

  64. Nikki says:

    I’m so thrilled to have found your site, it is fabulous! I have been a freelance food writer and restaurant reviewer for the last decade contributing to newspapers and magazines. I have recently started blogging and am really enjoying writing online and want to do more and of course as writing is my job I want to be paid! Your site is a great place to start learning the ropes of this new arena.
    Thanks for what you are sharing.

  65. Lorna says:

    Excellent post Carol. You’re doing great and are a great inspiration for many of us who blog. Keep up the great work!
    Lorna recently posted..Why Are There so Many People Failing at Working From Home?

  66. Philos says:

    When i first started a blog in late 2011, I wrote more than 30 posts in one month at one point then as time passed by I started writing less, not because I was short of ideas or was suffering from burnout.

    May be I thought putting out that much content made me look somewhat crazy – may be I was procrastinating a lot.

    May be it is time to get ‘crazy’ again and write some more.
    Philos recently posted..Kenyan judiciary: judges and magistrates vetting board mentions names of judges unfit to serve in the appellate court

  67. Taylor says:

    Wow! Your success is really inspirational. I’ve been wanting to do some freelance writing but thought I’d be relegated to making $5 or so per article.

  68. I tell people all the time that landing a bunch of small jobs is better than always going for the big payout. Your chances are better at getting smaller jobs in most cases.

    I will admit that I feel exhausted just reading over the list of all the things you do each month. You must have time management super powers.

    Great post as always.
    John McDuffie recently posted..Facebook Cheat Sheet

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hi John –

      I’m afraid you may have missed the point here…all my work is ongoing clients. Doing one-off small jobs almost always results in earning less, as you have to start marketing all over again after each of those small jobs is over. Your chances of getting a small job may be better, because pro writers don’t want those gigs! And there’s a reason why…

  69. Zelda Zerafa says:

    Hi Carol,

    Came across your site while surfing the net for tips on marketing myself as a writer/blogger. I’m in the same position as many here, where I have written articles for low pay to get some practice and samples. I know I can write well but just can’t get any clients paying $50 per post. That is what I’m trying to do now…

    You said that having your own blog helps… but isn’t having decent samples on other blogs enough? I haven’t had time,energy or money to set up my own blog but when applying for jobs on let’s say Problogger job board I provide links to published content on blogs or Hubpages. I want to combine blogging for others with setting up blogs to sell affiliate products but I need money to support my family in the meantime.
    It is so frustrating to apply for blogging jobs and never hear back… Oh and I’ve taken what you said about A List Blogger on board too.

    • Carol Tice says:

      I think having your own blog helps a lot…certainly if you’re guesting on top blogs that’s important too. Maybe you could get it done without a blog of your own, I just haven’t heard about it happening.

  70. I love this!

    Keep it up!

  71. Rob F. says:

    Carol, one thing that jumped out at me from that article is: “…even at decent rates, blogging is a grind.”

    When I think “grind”, I tend to think of unpleasant, tedious monotony – like when I catch myself playing Halo 4 multiplayer when deep down I really don’t want to (it’s just this inner spoiled brat that says “It’s a game, therefore it’s fun” even when it isn’t, and doing a little housework might actually meet a need to be at peace that the gamer-urge is trying to override).

    While asking that every moment be an ongoing bliss of ecstatic joy as the words come pouring out of your fingers is way overmuch, do you still have those moments of “I love my job, but I wish it didn’t involve this crap!”? If so, what do you do when they hit?
    Rob F. recently posted..Paid to Play Episode 15: Kelly Gurnett, Cordelia Calls It Quits

    • Carol Tice says:

      You speak, I’m betting, as someone who has never had to develop 3 ideas a week all about sexy topics like surety bonds.

      While yes, it certainly beats working in the mines, needing to deliver multiple well-executed ideas week after week is wearing after a while, especially if it’s not your favorite subject.

      What I learned over time was to limit the number of paid blogging gigs I do at any one time. Right now I’ve just wrapped up 4 years writing 3x a week for Entrepreneur, and am down to blogging for Forbes (3x a week) and Freelance Switch (usually once a week), plus my own blog. Beyond there I want article or white paper or different writing types. I had one point where I was doing upwards of 70 posts a month…and it was really exhausting me, and it was impossible to take a vacation! Couldn’t blog far enough ahead to take time off.

      When I get that feeling — “this is becoming oppressive” — I look to find a new client and drop the one that’s numbing my brain. I thrive on new challenges so at some point for me, it’s usually time to move on. Hope that helps –

  72. Glenn says:

    Hi Carol,

    I’m so impressed with the figures that you have provided :) Just goes to show that with the right attitude and effort anything is possible.

    Of course it can be difficult for the newbie to grab those bigger jobs. Many times they will be faced with having to accept the much lower priced blog articles, just to keep an element of cash coming in.

    It’s kinda refreshing that you don’t insist that it is easy to do. It all about grafting hard and getting rewarded for your work.

    Thanks again & good luck for the future,
    Glenn
    Glenn recently posted..7 Tips for Effective Blog Content

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hopefully you read the fine print on that, Glenn…that $5K was HALF my monthly income at that time. So I was making all those posts fit in less than my total work week. At the same time I was writing articles, white papers, and static web pages as well.

      I’d disagree that you “have” to accept much lower priced blog articles. You’re making a choice to do that. You could pump gas or work as a bar back for that “element of cash” while you hold out for professional rates, too.

      I’m working with writers in Freelance Writers Den who’re moving up quickly and getting $50-$100 a post ongoing contracts, once they understand how to blog for clients, how to identify quality clients with real budgets, and how to market themselves.

      It’s definitely not easy to do — what’s easy is to read Craigslist ads and take $10 a post gigs and not learn how to improve your writing or how to proactively market your business.

      But it’s definitely not impossible to move up to real rates. ;-)

  73. Natalie says:

    Thanks for writing about your success with blogging. I just started a blog and am learning all about “following” and blog-talk haha. I agree with you that blogs have a fun tone. I feel like I can integrate more personality and styles into my blog that I wouldn’t be able to with paying clients. This helps fulfill my love of creative writing. I have been learning quite a bit from your posts and would like to thank you again for taking the time to share such useful information with us.
    Natalie recently posted..My Goals for the New Year

  74. This is exactly where I’m trying to go! I’m half way there. Thanks for posting! :)

  75. I consider myself a working-class blogger. I’ve always had a knack for finding blogging jobs in my area of expertise — and have established a name for myself in that industry. Most of those opportunities happened because I took the ‘bull by the horns’ and contacted the company directly.

    I’ve earned most of my living from blogging over the last seven years… most of it involved writing for others. I realize that some bloggers can’t stand the idea of writing for others — BUT if the money is there, the money is there. Don’t look down at it.
    Brian Sherwin recently posted..Why Artists Need to Develop a Thick Skin: Part 2 — How do artists develop a thick skin3F

  76. Mike says:

    Is it frowned upon to post the same blogging material on multiple sites?

    • Carol Tice says:

      Well…you’d need to have the right to do that. Most of the clients I blog for, I don’t retain the rights — they own it. So I wouldn’t be posting it again anywhere else.

      Also Google tends to penalized duplicate content, so reprinting I think is falling steadily out of favor.

      I’ve often written about the same topic again, but I write a completely unique post for the new client.

    • Mike, if you’re stuck for ideas, you might check out the post on Copyblogger called “22 Ways to Create Compelling Content When You Don’t Have a Clue [Infographic]” It’s a great resource for ideas and specifically mentions reusing (or repurposing) your current content.
      Robert Jennings recently posted..Why You Can’t Make a Living Doing What You’re Doing

  77. May says:

    Love this post. Lots of people are trying but struggling to make money blogging. Thanks for sharing your experience that you have to value your writing and charge accordingly.
    May recently posted..International Women’s Day Networking Lunch 8 March

  78. SR Cloud says:

    Your output is truly prolific. I wonder, do you feel you could write as much in a different medium or is the pressure of blogging deadlines that motivates you?

    I like that you tell it straight here. Thanks for the dose of realism.
    SR Cloud recently posted..Peace and war and other vices

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    will be tweeting this to my followers! Outstanding blog and fantastic
    style and design.

  81. Joining the Freelance Writers Den is the smartest thing I ever did. If you don’t want to be bothered with scouring the Internet – for endless hours – join The Freelance Writers Den. It’s all right there for you. Tons of great info, resources, links, lessons, forums and free stuff (especially for the beginner). I joined 2 months ago and haven’t absorbed half of what’s there yet – and their always adding more. It’s well worth the $25 per-month and probably the best deal on the web!
    Joseph Rathjen recently posted..Edward Snowden – “The Man Without A Country”!

  82. Josh Brancek says:

    OMG, 5k a month from blogging alone??? That is unreal I think in a good way!!! I hope I will earn at least 1k a month from my blogging efforts, it would be great!!!
    Josh Brancek recently posted..The Top 12 Reasons Why Women Reject Men (Almost Instantly)

    • Carol Tice says:

      It’s all about the quality of client you go after, Josh. Get off Craigslist and the Problogger job board and target businesses and publications that are making good money, and you will, too.

  83. Samuel says:

    Wow, Carol, this was a mind-bogglingly informative and motivational article. I patiently read every single comment and I most say, the comments, and your intelligent and level-headed replies to them, were highly inspiring. My eye is on your blog, as I really want to convert my skills in writing and research to a high stream of income for me. Thanks very much.
    Samuel recently posted..Nigeria’s Educational System.

    • Carol Tice says:

      You’re welcome! I’m always being told I give too much away in the comments and should save some of that stuff for future posts…but I love chatting with my readers. ;-)

  84. devidlemon says:

    how can i get more than 50 dollars per post? I am a freelance writer . so i want earn money form writing article . Anyone please advice me . What can i do now ?

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hi Devid –

      I’m going to guess the first step for you in finding more lucrative blogging clients would be to improve your English, judging from the errors I see in just your 2-line post above. There’s a great book out by Ben Yagoda called How To Not Write Bad that could help you with that.

      Once you’ve strengthened your English skills, you’ll want to proactively target successful medium to larger sized companies and steer away from the Craigslist ads and startup websites. Those are the types of clients that offer higher rates. I once did a large project at $300 a post for a Fortune 500 company. When it comes to clients, bigger often really is better.

  85. Vicki says:

    I guess my answer to this is “Wow”! I just can’t contemplate writing 58 posts in a month – heck, I don’t think I could manage 30!

    Hopefully, it is one of those cases where practice makes perfect, and that includes recording your ideas somehow, so that you always have some on hand, and really brushing up on connecting abilities.

    The idea of that first guest post is becoming so exciting!

  86. Sounds like a great plan! I’ve been on LinkedIn, Twitter and StumbleUpon for about 3-months now have received about 30% more views on my own blog then before I joined. It also led to 2 steady writing gigs. It may seem like baby steps at first, but if you have the time, it’s well worth the planning.
    Joseph Rathjen recently posted..How To Clean The House With Your Spouse And Keep Your Self-Respect!

  87. Enstine Muki says:

    Interesting post. I love to be paid to write an article. My recent deal was on Darnell’s blog. Now, I’m looking forward to joining your team too
    Enstine Muki recently posted..Paid Guest Posting – Exactly how I got paid $100 per guest article

  88. Ally says:

    I havent’t thought of this before but it sounds so simple. So many companies are beginning to realise the importance of blogging and i think there will be a lot more paid opportunities for bloggers in the future
    Ally recently posted..Using Twitter For Marketing Your Blog

  89. Ankita says:

    Hi Carol,

    There is so much to learn from this post! Thank you for sharing. I’m new into freelance writing and have been working on Elance.com and odesk.com for the past one year. I think now is the time to move up the ladder with all the experience under my belt, and look for higher paying clients. I am now taking my freelance work more seriously and have started pitching to magazines, blogs and websites. I mostly write in the Health, Relationships, Food, Travel and inspiration categories. Do you think it is possible to earn anywhere between $50-$100 per post if I pitch to high-traffic websites and write regular posts for magazines? I’m not so good at financial writing and therefore I prefer sticking to lifestyle categories that interest me. I also have a background in Psychology and that has been a huge advantage by far. I’m also launching my own blog soon and like you said, it can help clients find me.
    I look forward to your response.

    Best regards,
    Ankita

    • Carol Tice says:

      Hi Ankita — I don’t write in those niches so I’m not that familiar with the blogging markets — but my experience is that there is good pay anywhere the topic is sophisticated and can’t be written by just anyone.

      So if you have the knowledge to blog for a cruise company, for instance, or exotic adventure company, or for a state or city tourism office, pay might be good. Blogging for big ad revenue-share type sites in your niches won’t pay much. Depends on the TYPE of client and level of complexity of what you discuss within those niches. Health should certainly have many opportunities.

  90. Jade Helm says:

    HI Carol,

    Thank you so much for this article and for your service to the freelance writing profession. I am struggling to determine a price for blogging. Two companies have approached me and I will meet with them next week. You stated you try to get $100 an hour for blogging. How do you adjust this price if site visits, interviews, and photography are involved? I also hold an advanced degree in my blogging subject matter. Thanks in advance for any advice you can offer,

    • Carol Tice says:

      I don’t adjust. If it takes longer, it costs more so that your hourly rate remains the same.

      If you’re doing in person visits and interviews, it’s really more of an article and should pay at $1 a word likely. If you’re blogging on a unique expertise area that not many writers know, of course, charge even more. I know people getting $250-$500 a blog post and more, if it’s magazine-quality writing that’s simply being posted on a blog.

      I consider $100 a floor for a blog post that doesn’t require more than one quick phone interview.

  91. O'Brian Gunn says:

    This was quite an eye-opening and inspiring post!

    I’ve recently made the decision to take the next step in my freelance writing career since I’ve done content mill writing long enough. Posts like this are just what I need to light a freelancing fire under me and help me to take the plunge and see what happens. Hopefully I’ll become a freelance writer success like you!

    Thanks again, Carol!
    O’Brian Gunn recently posted..Reminds me a bit of Aaliyah. Now I have the sudden urge to go…

  92. Robin says:

    Hi Carol – love your blog and really love this inspirational post! I just got a 3-month paying gig blogging for a small company once per week at a rate of $150 per post. I never would have felt comfortable bidding this if not for this post so many many thanks for giving me a pep in my step! I just wanted to know if there is a standard practice with how one should bill/invoice clients like these. For my design projects I just bill when the project is finalized. This is more on-going and so I feel more inclined to invoice twice a month so I’m paid consistently – but I’m unsure if this is best practice for independent bloggers. Would you mind sharing any insight you have in this very important area?

    • Carol Tice says:

      Congrats on the rate! Very nice. There’s more and more business blogging out there at pro rates, if you target successful mid-sized businesses and bigger.

      I get a 50% advance for first month and 50% at end, and then just bill once a month myself…but would depend on how many $150 posts a month they want. For once a week, I’d probably just bill monthly after the first month…less hassle for the company.

      • Robin says:

        Thank you! Greatly appreciate your feedback and quick response. I do agree once a month would be easier for this client as they are a small team. One more question for you – do you send a report or summary of work done with your invoices? I typically do this for other clients but those are normally more involved than strictly blogging; social media marketing, campaigns, analytics, etc. So I send a pretty detailed, pretty time consuming report. I’m wondering if I need to put together something similar for this blogging project…outlining monthly posts, or is this over-kill? Again, many thanks for your valuable time.

  93. Amanda says:

    Carol, you’re one of the reasons I’m seriously thinking about freelance writing–your amazing success makes me feel like I can do it too.

    I already have a website, a portfolio, a pristine social media presence, and all that jazz… but I never thought about pitching to businesses who have shotty blogs (or no blogs at all). Only problem is that I’m struggling to find the words to use with them–what can I say in friendly emails to marketing managers to convince them that they need my writing?
    Amanda recently posted..Freelance is Brewing

  94. Can you point me to some sites that are looking for writers, please?

  95. mc says:

    OK, $5000 from blogging sounds excellent but we all have a few of punctual questions about how to get there.

    I like writing but I am not an American so excuse my grammar. The questions I have for you is the following:

    Let’s suppose that I am an amazing writer and I have a lot of knowledge in “X” topic and I want to write about

    1. What is the easiest platform to use?
    2. When you just have 130 friends in Facebook from which 2 are your actual friends. How exactly do people start reading you? You have no physical contacts in the area nor a digital life that can back up the experience but again, you are a good writer so this is not a matter of the quality if the content, is mere networking question. You don’t know anyone online or in real life who wants to read you
    3. How long did it take you to get there? 3 months, 6 months? A year?
    4. Did you also have a full time job? How did you manage to arrange your “free time” if the answer is yes. I mean, if you are looking for extra income most likely you are not making enough money, which means that you have to cook your meals and clean up your own apartment, …. Right after your working hours. How do you manage that part of getting your business going? Can you provide some tips about it?
    5. Also, let’s suppose you don’t have much knowledge about blogging. Do you have any recommendations?

    Any help would be deeply appreciated it.

    Cheers,
    MC

    • Carol Tice says:

      MC, the paid blogging I did was not about monetizing my own blog, or needing to have a huge social media following — I definitely didn’t at the time I was doing this.

      There isn’t an “easiest platform” for doing it. This was about going out and getting business clients who wanted blogging. But if you mean platform for your own blog, you want to be on self-hosted WordPress. Free platforms do not impress clients that you’re serious about this.

      I’d say from when I first started blogging for others for pay, it maybe took 6-8 months to hit that level. At the time I did not have a full-time job — I was freelancing very full time — that $5,000 some months was only about half my income from freelancing overall.

      If you don’t have much knowledge about blogging, your ramp would certainly be longer. I came into this as a very experienced journalist, and had launched my own blog already, before landing my first paid gig.

      To learn more about launching your blog, I recommend Kickstart Your Blog, a course by the A-List Blogger Club folks that you can read all about on my Products I Love page. A-List helped me launch this blog and their trainings are terrific.

      Start with your own blog, then guest post on the most prominent places you can work your way into. Those bigger blogs is where you’ll usually get noticed by clients.

      Hope this helps!

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