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Freelance Writing Forecast: Ride These Epic Trends in 2017

Freelance writing forecast: Ride these epic trends in 2017. Makealivingwriting.com

Last year, I got out my crystal ball and created a freelance writing forecast that identified 12 hot writing niches for the past year. (You can check and see how I did.)

That post was one of the most useful posts of the year, judging from the traffic it got, so I’ve decided to do a new forecast for 2017.

But this time, rather than good-paying types of writing, I’m calling out the hot trends you should know about to earn well in the coming year.

How you take advantage of these trends and freelance writing forecast will depend on the kinds of writing you like to do and types of clients you serve. These are top-level trends that will affect all of us, whether you’re into blogging, magazine writing, or copywriting.

I’ve included action items that explain how to take advantage of each of these trends in the coming year.

The freelance writing forecast looks bright

The short version: I’ve never been more excited about the opportunities for freelance writers than I am right now.

Ready? Let’s look at the seven biggest trends coming down the pike:

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7 Simple Strategies for Getting Paid Big Freelance Bucks

Freelance writer got big money

Across the conference table, two business owners sat staring at me, as I explained why they needed to hire me as their writer.

I discussed what they needed — social media, blog articles, employee profiles — and to my newbie surprise, they bought it. All of it. They stood up, shook my hand and eagerly requested a proposal.

I shook their hands, smiled, and nearly collapsed into a puddle of anxiety after I left the room.

This was my first experience with a potential business client, and I had no clue how I’d move forward.

What do I charge? What do I put in my proposal? What do I do next?

Luckily, I had resources, and I put them to work. Here’s what I did to secure my first business client and first big freelance job — at a great pay rate:

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How One Freelancer Broke in and Earned Big Writing E-Learning Content

E-learningMy freelance writing career didn’t begin with a bang. In fact, it didn’t take off until I stumbled into the uncharted territory of e-learning.

I honestly didn’t give much thought to writing course materials, because I thought online courses were always written by professors, subject matter experts, or a company’s staff.

I was wrong.

As the e-learning industry grows, corporations are seeking out talented writers with a knack for creativity to help them provide engaging, well-written, and easy-to-understand content.

Depending on the length of a course, the amount of research and writing time needed, and other factors such as client management, a writer can start charging anywhere from $1,200-$5,000 per project, for the writing portion alone.

After all, according to Global Industry Analysts, Inc., corporate training is a $200 billion business — and e-learning is a growing chunk of that. There is definitely money for writers to make in this industry.

For writers interested in diving headfirst into writing e-learning content, here’s how I started from scratch and broke into this niche:

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The Trick to Writing Business Profiles So They Aren’t Sleazy PR

Freelance writer comes off like PR person

One well-paid niche many freelance writers aspire to get into is writing business profiles. But often, when writers try this niche, they discover a problem.

The piece reads more like a press release for the company. This business owner is awesome! Their product is amazing!

One writer recently asked me:

“I’m interviewing a local businesswoman tomorrow that I pitched to my editor. This piece will appear in the business section of the newspaper. The editor asked that I not make the story too advertorial. My question is, what should I ask to help balance the story?”–Janet

Great question. Because too many writers turn in pieces that end up getting killed because they aren’t balanced, hard-hitting business profiles — they’re more like “puff” pieces or thinly disguised PR work.

The editor might start to wonder if you’re secretly on that business’s payroll and just posing as a journalist. That’s why badly done business profiles die.

How can you please business editors with your profile? Here are my tips:

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How to Get Freelance Writing Clients Begging to Hire You

Many freelance writers are trapped in a cycle of desperation, hoping a client might hire them at any rate, no matter how low. Today, let’s talk about the other side of that coin. Yes, there is one! It’s the dynamic

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How to Become a Highly Paid Copywriter From Scratch

Are you looking to ditch the low-paid writing gigs and move up to lucrative freelance writing work? About five years ago, I was that writer. I’d spent 12 years as a staff journalist, was freelancing for regional and national magazines

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