Blog Archives

7 Important Reasons You Don’t Get Well-Paid Ghostwriting Gigs

Discover the Invisible Market of Well-Paid Ghostwriting Gigs. Makealivingwriting.com

Have you been ghostwriting blog posts for chump change?

There’s a ton of this type of ghostwriting out there. You churn out post after post for $35 or maybe $75 or $100 if you’re lucky, never being able to claim a byline. Often, you don’t even have permission to use these in your portfolio.

It’s a bad deal.

Here’s the ghostwriting secret nobody tells you: Ghostwriting should pay a lot. You’re not getting credit for this work! So the only payoff to you is purely financial.

The good news is, there are situations where ghostwriting pays great. In fact, it pays $35,000 an assignment and up.

Yes, that’s the floor for this work! Not kidding. Well-paid ghostwriting projects are out there, but you need to know how to find them.

Interested?

I’m talking about the world of professional book ghostwriters. Sadly, most freelance writers will never join this elite club.

Why? Here are seven big reasons:

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Getting Freelance Writing Jobs at $250 an Hour — The Brainy Way

The brainy way to get freelance writing jobs for $250 an hour. Makealivingwriting.com

I wasn’t always a freelance writer. In fact, I used to be a brainy corporate accountant who made a six-figure income. But I wanted out in a bad way. And I made up my mind that I could earn a decent living by booking well-paying freelance writing jobs.

Here’s how it all went down. I raided my 401(k), a very un-CPA-like thing to do, bought a townhouse, renovated it and flipped it. Pretty smart, right? But I still needed freelance writing jobs lined up before I could quit my day job. And not the content-mill kind.

So I joined the Freelance Writers Den and went through the bootcamp, “Learn to Write White Papers,” by Steve Slaunwhite. That was my light-bulb moment. Writing white papers was the perfect match for my skills and goals to get freelance writing jobs that paid pro rates. Without hesitation, I named my new business and launched my site, “Savvy White Papers.”

With that done I busted my butt until I had a $250/hr contract in my hand and a check in the bank. Want to know how to land freelance writing jobs that pay top dollar? Here’s how I did it:

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How a Newbie Blogger Negotiated a 100 Percent Raise

Bloggers: Get a 100% Raise

In early 2016, I landed my first freelance blogging client.

It was a big win for me, even though it wasn’t in my niche (because I  hadn’t really figured out what my niche was yet). The client actually reached out to me after seeing some of my blog posts on Facebook.

But there was a problem. I had no idea what to charge, and the client wanted to know my rate.

I pored over everything I could find online, asked around, and finally settled on a rate of $50 per 500-750 word blog post. I sent the editor my rates, and voila – I had my first contract in place.

I jumped into writing awesome blog content for this client. But it didn’t take long to start second guessing my rate. Was I charging enough for this type of work? What were other writings charging for writing similar blog content? What would need to happen to raise my rates and keep this client?

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The Life-Changing Magic for Freelance Writers Who Need to Earn More

Freelance Writers: This is Magic. Makealivingwriting.com

Did you know that there’s one strategy freelance writers can use to earn more, almost like magic?

No, it’s not decluttering your house. Though that does help many of us be more productive.

It’s a way of bidding on freelance writing gigs that gets you earning more, every time.

I was reminded of this successful formula recently on a Den 2X Income Accelerator mastermind. Here’s how the story went:

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12 Free Tools to Help You Bid High on Freelance Writing Gigs

Toolbox for freelance writers

There’s nothing more exciting than getting a client nibble. It doesn’t matter where it came from, in that thrilling moment when you open their email or hear them on the phone.

Excitement! Visions of dollar signs dance in your head.

That is, until the moment you ask the client what they pay, and they say, “I don’t know — I was hoping you’d tell me your rates, or put together a bid.”

Gulp. Then you end up second-guessing yourself, bidding super-low, and wondering if you left money on the table.

And you probably did.

If you’re at a loss when you have to name your price, let me acquaint with you my toolbox for sleuthing out appropriate rates, and getting information about a prospect. Whether it’s a magazine or a business, there are ways of getting a sense of whether they’re a $10 million company, they’ve only got 5,000 subscribers, or have just three employees.

You can do this fairly quickly — and it shouldn’t cost a dime. I don’t usually spend more than 10 minutes researching a prospect, using free resources, before I have a clear sense of whether I think they will pay pro rates.

Here’s my list of research tools for getting company details:

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The Deadly Math Mistake That Will Make Your Freelance Business Fail

A lot of writers aren’t good at math. When I say that, I don’t just mean that we didn’t get an “A” in algebra back in high school. Or that a lot of writers don’t want to take article assignments

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