rejection

Dealing With Rejection: 5 Bulletproof Strategies for Writers

5 Bulletproof Strategies for Dealing with Rejection. Makealivingwriting.com.

Rejection is inevitable when you’re a freelancer. You send out queries and LOIs, you’ll be dealing with rejection.

You get some bites and quote on projects…but then you meet up with characters like No, Not Now, Maybe Later, and Not Interested. When you find yourself reading yet another writing rejection, how do you respond?

Do you bounce back like a rubber band? Or does your confidence get flattened like a pancake?

Too many freelancers let writing rejection get in the way of success. And that’s a big problem. If you let rejection beat you down, you’re not going to make a living writing.

Believe me. I know what it’s like. I started out as a columnist and magazine writer. I experienced some early success and then I stalled. Editors started nailing No’s to my forehead. It was hard not to take it personally. Every writing rejection felt like proof I wasn’t any good, that nobody wanted my work.

I knew I had to do something about it. Fortunately, after a lot of research, trial and error, and thrashing around, I developed five bulletproof strategies.

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Why Your Article Pitch Was Rejected

freelance writer wondering why she was rejected

There are five stages to pitching a story idea to an editor:

  1. You get an article idea
  2. You write the idea up, in a query letter or letter of introduction.
  3. You send the pitch letter in, usually via email.
  4. You wait, frequently in vain, for a response.
  5. You begin the second-guessing game, and start wondering why your article pitch didn’t get you an assignment.

That fifth stage often sends writers into an emotional tailspin, and sucks up way too much time. But it shouldn’t. Really, it shouldn’t exist at all.

There are only two basic reasons why article ideas get rejected — and once you know them, it can help you move on to writing that next query more quickly.

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Answers to 20 Fascinating Freelance Writing Questions + Contest Winners!

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I have to admit, I’m amazed.

When I asked you earlier this week to send me your freelance writing questions, I figured the entries would all be stuff I’d seen before (since I just wrote an e-book in which I answer over 100 questions).

Yes, there were plenty of those common freelance writing questions, like “How do I get started?”

But I also got a nice batch of fresh and interesting new questions! Rather than going on and on in a comment thread that has 140+ comments last I checked, I thought I’d answer them in more depth here on this post.

I’ll start with the four top questions that are the winners of my Freelance Writers Den 4th Anniversary contest. Writers who submimtted the rest of the questions I’m answering here will each be receiving a complimentary advance copy of my soon-to-be-released e-book, 100+ Freelance Writing Questions Answered.

In case you missed it back on Tuesday — the Writers Den is turning 4 this week, and we’re celebrating with goodies and prizes.

The big prize that’s open to everyone: Freelance Writers Den is open to new members for the next 4 days! This will be our last summer open, and last time to join before our next Den bootcamp on overcoming fears, which is coming this fall.

Here are the winning questions, along with my answers:

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How I Got to Write a Regular Column — After My Article Was Rejected

writing a regular column

One of the most satisfying freelance writing gigs to snag is a regular column. The chance to write what you want on a regular basis, and have ongoing work you can rely on…it’s a dream.

There are a lot fewer opportunities out there to become a columnist than there were a decade or two back, so these can be hard to land.

But I got one in the most unusual way.

I totally screwed up an assignment for a new editor. But I handled it with grace, and turned the situation into a monthly column that’s easy to write — and nets me $150–$200 per hour in ongoing income.

Here’s how I did it…

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Grow Your Writing Income Next Year by Making This Key Change Now

Plant in dried cracked mud

As the year winds down, do your thoughts turn to your writing goals for the coming year? I know mine do.

Now’s the time to lay the groundwork to earn more in the months ahead.

But it’s also a busy time for many of us — there’s shopping, travel, vacationing, kids at home, visiting, decorating the house, and more.

Still, there’s one change you can begin making right now that I promise you will set the stage for a more lucrative freelance New Year. This will take a minute a day, tops.

It involves taking quick action to eliminate the single biggest problem freelance writers face.

Do you know where that massive stumbling block is located? Well, go to a mirror and take a look at your head…

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How Getting Rejected Made Me a Better Freelance Writer

Freelance writer gets rejection letter

How do you react when someone tells you “no”? The answer might be the key to building a successful freelance writing career.

Whether you’re an aspiring freelancer, a veteran, or somewhere in between, you’re going to deal with rejection. And hearing “no” when you’ve put in the time, research, and effort to construct the perfect query can be devastating.

What do you do?

If you’re going to be a successful freelance writer, you have only one choice — learn to hear that “no” and use it to become a better freelance writer. Here’s how:

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